Wildlife conservation – Rio Grande Delta Audubon http://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 08:43:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-50x50.png Wildlife conservation – Rio Grande Delta Audubon http://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/ 32 32 Brian Sheth and the Sheth Sangreal Foundation Wildlife Conservation Efforts https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/brian-sheth-and-the-sheth-sangreal-foundation-wildlife-conservation-efforts/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 08:43:53 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/brian-sheth-and-the-sheth-sangreal-foundation-wildlife-conservation-efforts/ Views of the publication: 208 Brian Sheth is a first generation Indo-American businessman who became a self-made billionaire in 2015 before the age of 40. Forbes recorded his net worth at $ 2.2 billion in 2018 and ranked him 359th richest people in America in 2020. Sheth is also a dedicated philanthropist and established the […]]]>

Views of the publication: 208

Brian Sheth is a first generation Indo-American businessman who became a self-made billionaire in 2015 before the age of 40. Forbes recorded his net worth at $ 2.2 billion in 2018 and ranked him 359th richest people in America in 2020. Sheth is also a dedicated philanthropist and established the Sheth Sangreal Foundation in 2011, with his wife Adria. The primary purpose of the Sangreal Foundation is to manage Sheth’s philanthropic efforts, which primarily focus on wildlife conservation. He is also Chairman Emeritus of Re: wild, formerly known as Global Wildlife Conservation (GWC). Re: wild protects wildlife and ecosystems in more than 50 countries.

Overview

The Sheth Sangreal Foundation has participated in 430 projects to date and has formed 90 partnerships with conservation groups in over 80 countries. He spent $ 60 million on these efforts, which saved 50,000 square miles of forest and saved 83 species from extinction. The community projects of the Sheth Sangreal Foundation have positively impacted the lives of over 120,000 children.

Approach

Sheth applies the same systems-driven strategies that have brought him success in the financial industry to the conservation projects he supports. These strategies focus on maximizing operational performance, enabling the Sheth Sangreal Foundation to fulfill its goal of supporting the well-being of all life on Earth. Sheth also believes in building strong partnerships with business leaders and communities to support projects. This strategy ensures that the Foundation provides the necessary resources to be successful in its conservation efforts.

Sheth’s approach to projects includes the following phases:

  • Research
  • Resources
  • Logistic support
  • Collaboration

The Sheth Sangreal Foundation begins its search for worthwhile projects by prioritizing geographic areas and identifying the most pressing issues in those areas. The research phase also includes identifying the partners best placed to resolve these issues, assuming they have the necessary resources.

The next phase is to identify the resources these partners need to overcome the challenges that have limited their success so far. These resources typically include funding, subject matter expertise, manpower, and support from communities and government agencies.

The Sheth Sangreal Foundation then provides behind-the-scenes logistical support to ensure the smooth running of its partners’ operations. This function allows the project to adhere to the culture and principles of its organizers while achieving the desired results.

The Sheth Sangreal Foundation also shares resources with its partners, including lessons learned, best practices and project leaders. This phase aims to use what works in its other projects, allowing the Foundation to bring benefits to its partners that go beyond funding.

World Wildlife Conservation

The Sheth Sangreal Foundation participated in a donation challenge with the Re: wild in 2018, resulting in $ 15 million in donations from the Foundation and an additional $ 17 million from other donors. This $ 32 million fund has enabled Re: wild to continue its mission of conserving the diversity of life on Earth, including projects in the following areas:

  • Vietnam
  • Redonda
  • Bahamas
  • Amazon
  • Asia
  • Nicaragua
  • Australia
  • New Zealand

Vietnam

Pu Mat National Park is one of Vietnam’s most important conservation sites. It is located in the Annamese mountains, which are home to a number of mammals in need of protection. These include the saola, which looks like an antelope, and the Annamese striped rabbit. The muntjac is another critically endangered timber animal that inhabits this region.

Redonda

Redonda is a Caribbean island that was previously barren due to overexploitation. Re: wild developed a management and protection plan for this area which has enabled it to regain its original luxuriant state. This project involved a number of Re: wild partners, including the Sangreal Foundation.

Bahamas

Marine life around the Bahamas is threatened by a number of activities, including agricultural runoff, destruction of reefs, and unsustainable fishing. Re: wild’s partners in this wildlife protection project included Discovery Channel, The Bahamas National Trust, and Shark Tank’s Daymond John.

Amazon

The Amazon is the largest rainforest on Earth, which provides ecological benefits to the entire planet. Re: wild has engaged in a number of projects to create protected areas in this region that are both well funded and managed. These areas use a variety of conservation mechanisms, including government protection, private protection, and community conservation.

Asia

Both the Java and Sumatran rhinos in Asia are on the brink of extinction, with both species having fewer than 100 living members. Re: wild is working with several partners to restore their populations by stopping poaching activities. Observers expect this project to be particularly difficult as the horn of the Java rhino is worth around $ 30,000 per kilo on the Asian black market.

Nicaragua

The Indio Maíz Biological Reserve in Nicaragua is one of the last habitats for a number of large endangered animals. These include the Baird’s Tapir and the Jaguar, the largest cat native to the Americas. Re: wild is working with local communities to protect these and other species in this area.

Australia

Re: wild’s efforts in Australia include a project to reintroduce mammals once native to the forests of southeast Australia. These species include the following:

  • Brush tail bettong
  • oriental quol
  • Long nosed potoroo
  • Parma Wallaby
  • Red bettong
  • Southern Brown Bandicoot
  • Tasmanian devil

New Zealand

Re: wild has several conservation projects in New Zealand. These include the restoration of the black stilt in the wild. This rare wading bird is critically endangered. Another project concerns the large-scale restoration of the kakapo in its former range. This flightless bird is the largest parrot in the world.

Coming from a modest background, Brian sheth is now considered a true definition of success through its global achievements and ever-growing fortunes. Its investment portfolio of more than 30 software industries and more than 45,000 employees around the world speaks for itself. Even in the midst of the pandemic, its philanthropic presence persists. Brian Sheth is actively involved with other billionaires, scientists and other agencies to stop the devastating effects of the Covid-19 pandemic. He is a man that many business people can admire and learn from.


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David Y. Ige | DLNR press release: OPENING OF THE STAMP CONTEST ON WILDLIFE CONSERVATION IN HAWAI’I https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/david-y-ige-dlnr-press-release-opening-of-the-stamp-contest-on-wildlife-conservation-in-hawaii/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 21:16:31 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/david-y-ige-dlnr-press-release-opening-of-the-stamp-contest-on-wildlife-conservation-in-hawaii/ DLNR press release: OPENING OF THE STAMP CONTEST ON WILDLIFE CONSERVATION IN HAWAI’I Posted on November 22, 2021 in Latest News, Press Room (Honolulu) – Artists are invited to submit entries to the Forestry and Wildlife Division (DOFAW) of DLNR for the annual art competition featuring two local wildlife for the 2022-2023 conservation stamp. Hawaii […]]]>

DLNR press release: OPENING OF THE STAMP CONTEST ON WILDLIFE CONSERVATION IN HAWAI’I

Posted on November 22, 2021 in Latest News, Press Room

(Honolulu) – Artists are invited to submit entries to the Forestry and Wildlife Division (DOFAW) of DLNR for the annual art competition featuring two local wildlife for the 2022-2023 conservation stamp. Hawaii wildlife and game birds.

The Wildlife Conservation Stamp is a requirement on Hawaii State Hunting Licenses. The game bird stamp is required for anyone intending to hunt game birds. Both stamps will be available to stamp collectors.

Subject of this year’s stamps

Feathered game pad- Chukar Partridge (Alectoris chukar) (found on all major Hawaiian Islands) was introduced to Hawaiʻi in 1923. It is native to Asia and Eastern Europe, from Israel to Nepal. They are approximately 14 inches long and have a gray-brown back with sides striped with black and white feathers. Their face is white with a black stripe across the eyes to the neck. They are a dominant component of avifauna in high altitude shrub areas and may have filled a niche occupied by now extinct or rare birds. The role of the exotic bird in facilitating seed dispersal and germination of native plant species has been shown to be beneficial for the restoration of degraded ecosystems.

Wildlife conservation stamp -`Iiwi (Vestiaria coccinea) are listed federally as threatened statewide. Adults have bright red plumage with black wings and tail and curved salmon-colored beaks. The juvenile is buff with black markings, the darker, shorter bill turning yellow then salmon with age. Feeds mainly on ‘ōhi’a nectar, but also visits the tubular flowers of undergrowth plants such as akala and lobelias and takes insects.

ENTRY CONDITIONS

SETTING: Hawaiian habitat

CUT: Painting completed with a maximum of 24 “by 36” and without frame (to be reduced to 1 “X 1.5” stamp)

WAY: Oil or acrylic

ENTRANCE: Finished oil or acrylic painting or an 8.5 “X 11” photo / print / photocopy of a finished painting

DEADLINE: All entries must be received no later than February 25, 2022. Notification of the winner will be made in March 2022.

SHIPPING COSTS: All paintings sent must be accompanied by a fee of $ 35, to cover the cost of returning the works of art. If a check is not included, you will need to go to the administration office to pick up your artwork. Checks are to be made payable to the DLNR. Alternatively, a photo, print or photocopy of an original painting can be sent free of charge (see request form).

PAYMENTS: The winner will receive a maximum prize of $ 1,000.

Funds from sales of Hawaii Wildlife Conservation Stamps go to the State Wildlife Revolving Fund to support wildlife populations and habitat and to manage hunting.

Over the past year, the revenues from the two stamps were used to cover part of the costs of maintaining the hunting units and to add hunting opportunities for game birds and marine mammals where possible. Proceeds from the sale of wildlife conservation stamps will also provide funds for the annual rental of the Lāna’i Cooperative Game Management Area lease and several other hunting leases.

# # #

RESOURCES

(All images / video courtesy of: DLNR)

Photographs: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/vasfe9ie68ad6r5/AADKqGLY1Y2URmacSwVRz02la?dl=0

Application form :

http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/recreation/files/2021/11/FY22-23-artist-application2doc3.pdf

Copies of this announcement and the entry form are available upon request from DOFAW, 1151 Punchbowl St., Room 325, Honolulu, HI 96813. For any questions regarding the competition or to obtain an entry, please send an email to: [email protected] or call (808) 347-6869.

Media contact:

Giovoni Parks
Communication specialist
Hawaii Department of Lands and Natural Resources
[email protected]
808-587-0396 (Communications office)

https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/


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nominations sought for Nevada Wildlife Conservation Award | Carson City Nevada News https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/nominations-sought-for-nevada-wildlife-conservation-award-carson-city-nevada-news/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 19:14:59 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/nominations-sought-for-nevada-wildlife-conservation-award-carson-city-nevada-news/ The Nevada Board of Wildlife Commissioners is currently seeking nominations for the 2021 Wayne E. Kirch Award for Wildlife Conservation in Nevada. The award is presented annually to recipients who have demonstrated significant results in the conservation, management or enhancement of wildlife. An individual, non-profit organization, outdoor sports club or business may be nominated for […]]]>

The Nevada Board of Wildlife Commissioners is currently seeking nominations for the 2021 Wayne E. Kirch Award for Wildlife Conservation in Nevada.

The award is presented annually to recipients who have demonstrated significant results in the conservation, management or enhancement of wildlife. An individual, non-profit organization, outdoor sports club or business may be nominated for the award. Len Warren of Nature Conservancy was the 2020 recipient of the award for his work in restoring habitats in northern and southern Nevada. Len will receive his award at the November Commission meeting.

The following criteria are taken into account when evaluating candidates:

– Duration and depth of commitment to conservation, management or enhancement of wildlife in the State of Nevada during the current calendar year.
– Influence of the person / project on the public and in presenting positive public relations regarding wildlife conservation in Nevada.
– Quantity and quality of measurable results for wildlife conservation.
– Obstacles, difficulties and personal sacrifices involved in achieving wildlife conservation goals.

A simple majority of votes from a jury consisting of two wildlife commissioners, staff from the Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) assigned to the Kirch Prize committee, four judges representing county advisory boards responsible for wildlife management or outdoor groups, and Marlene Kirch, daughter of former Commissioner Wayne E. Kirch.

The conservation award consists of a perpetual plaque in bronze and wood, on which is added the name of the recipient of the year. This prize is displayed at NDOW’s public offices, and each winner also receives a smaller version of the prize to keep.

This award is named in memory of Wayne E. Kirch, who served on the Fish and Game Commission for more than 25 years, the longest term on the board since its inception in 1877. Kirch proposed and championed the concept of a management area. of the state’s wildlife and has been a continuing force for wildlife conservation in Nevada. The Kirch Wildlife Management Area in southern Nevada is also named in his honor. Kirch, of Las Vegas, died in 1989.

All official nomination forms required for conservation awards are available from the Nevada Department of Wildlife regional offices or on the web at ndow.org. The 2021 Prize is intended for projects that took place in 2021. To be considered, applications must be received no later than November 15, 2021.

The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) protects, restores and manages fish and wildlife, promotes fishing, hunting and boating safety. NDOW’s wildlife and habitat conservation efforts are primarily funded by athlete licensing and conservation fees and a federal surtax on hunting and fishing gear. Support the conservation of wildlife and habitat in Nevada by purchasing a hunting, fishing, or combination license. For more information, visit ndow.org.


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Saudi Arabia-Led Inaugural Catmosphere Parade Raises Awareness of Wildlife Conservation https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/saudi-arabia-led-inaugural-catmosphere-parade-raises-awareness-of-wildlife-conservation/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/saudi-arabia-led-inaugural-catmosphere-parade-raises-awareness-of-wildlife-conservation/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 20:37:50 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/saudi-arabia-led-inaugural-catmosphere-parade-raises-awareness-of-wildlife-conservation/ RIYAD: Live music, painting, food trucks and hordes of wildlife lovers took to the streets of Saudi Arabia – and at events around the world – for the first ‘Catwalk’, hosted by the Saudi-led nonprofit Catmosphere on Saturday. Participants and volunteers gathered at the start line of the 7 km walk to show their support […]]]>

RIYAD: Live music, painting, food trucks and hordes of wildlife lovers took to the streets of Saudi Arabia – and at events around the world – for the first ‘Catwalk’, hosted by the Saudi-led nonprofit Catmosphere on Saturday.

Participants and volunteers gathered at the start line of the 7 km walk to show their support and raise awareness of the living conditions of the seven big cats that the organization supports, including at an event in Al-Ammariya in Riyadh.

The Catmosphere “Catwalk” kicked off in Saudi Arabia on November 6 with more than 10,000 volunteers to help raise awareness of endangered big cat species. (a photo)

Catmosphere was started by Princess Reema bint Bandar Al-Saud, Ambassador of Saudi Arabia to the United States, whose mission is to protect the lives and well-being of big cats. The association aims to amplify the efforts of Panthera, a US-based charity dedicated to the conservation of 40 species of feral cats.

Catmosphere focuses on lions, tigers, cheetahs, jaguars, pumas, leopards, and snow leopards.

With the walks open to the public, Princess Reema previously told Arab News, “’Catwalk’ aims for healthy habitat for big cats, and healthy habitats begin at home. A healthy, active lifestyle helps us respect our own bodies, and engaging with our environment gives us an appreciation for the fundamental role it plays in all of life. “Catwalk” invites us all to spark physical movement locally and in doing so, spark the big cat conservation movement globally. “


Saudi families gathered on November 6 to take part in the “Catwalk”, a 7 km outdoor walk to promote efforts to protect endangered big cats and their ecosystems. (a photo)

Walkers and runners kicked off around the world on November 6, with organizers reporting 10,000 participants in Saudi Arabia alone. Those who registered to participate could do so individually, in a group or as part of a company-organized event.


Catmosphere, founded by Ambassador to the United States, Princess Reema bint Bandar Al-Saud, supports big cat species around the world

Abdullah Abdulrahman bin Saeed, Deputy Minister of Municipal and Rural Affairs and Housing, kicked off the march in Al-Ammariya with a speech thanking the crowd for their involvement.

“We thank everyone for coming here today to raise awareness of this important initiative launched by Her Royal Highness Princess Reema,” he said.


Khalid bin Bandar, Saudi Ambassador to the United Kingdom, participating in the parade in London. (Social media)

“We have launched 30 sites across the Kingdom … and we currently have over 10,000 registered volunteers, from Saudis to non-Saudis, who are now involved in raising awareness of this initiative,” the deputy minister added.

Prince Abdulaziz bin Turki Al-Faisal, Saudi Minister of Sports, Waleed Abdulkarim Elkhereiji, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs, Faisal Al-Ibrahim, Minister of Economy and Planning, Khalid bin Bandar, Saudi Ambassador to the United Kingdom, and Saad Mohammed Alarify, head of the Saudi mission to the EU, also participated in the march.

“The event is international – we have Princess Reema attending in Washington, there are participants from Copenhagen, Egypt, all over Europe – so it’s a global event.”


The Catmosphere “Catwalk” kicked off in Saudi Arabia on November 6 with more than 10,000 volunteers to help raise awareness of endangered big cat species. (a photo)

A walker, named Abdulaziz, told Arab News: “It is honestly an amazing experience, and I am happy that I was able to be here and express my feelings for the tiger to help endangered species. .

In addition to the participation of the animal-loving adults, the organizers also made sure to offer a shorter hike called “Catwalk Cub” – a 700-meter run – for the kids to show their support.

One of the young participants was Mohammed, 11, who revealed that he was walking in support of Arab big cats.


Prince Abdulaziz bin Turki Al-Faisal, Saudi Minister of Sports, also participated in the parade. (Social media)

While this was a family affair for Mohammed, who joined his siblings, other attendees were quick to praise the community spirit behind the event.

“A good friend of ours recommended this place and we thought it would be a wonderful event – it’s a great cause and a great place to do it, a great place to meet new people and chat,” participant Anthony Di Rosa told Arab News.

“I’m so happy to see a lot of people volunteering to run 7 km – it’s a great experience. I would love to share with people all over the world, we are here and we support this kind of initiative to protect all wildlife, ”social media influencer Muhanad Alhassoun told Arab News.


Waleed Abdulkarim Elkhereiji, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs, participated in Catwalk. (SPA)

“The purpose of this walk is to protect wildlife… we are building the community and the environment and we have to protect them,” he added.

His sober statement echoes Panthera’s warnings that important species are threatened by habitat loss, with tigers, lions, leopards and cheetahs losing between 65% and 96% of their historic populations.

“The reality of the pandemic and the experience the whole world has just had of separating and isolating human communities due to COVID-19 is largely what was done to the big cats when we cut their territorial corridors and isolated them from their natural habitats in nature, ”said Princess Reema of the destruction of the big cat environments.


Saudi families gathered on November 6 to take part in the “Catwalk”, a 7 km outdoor walk to promote efforts to protect endangered big cats and their ecosystems. (a photo)

“Just as we have seen this impact on us, imagine what this impact has been on them. “Catwalk” hopes to highlight a very simple fact: that our collective well-being is interconnected, and therefore it is incumbent upon all of us to operate out of empathy and provide spaces in which we humans would like to live and thrive, and ensure the same for big cats, ”she added.

And while the general public at the event in Riyadh seemed to have taken this message to heart, public officials also took to Twitter to show their support. Saudi Arabian Ambassador to Spain Azzam Al-Qain thanked Arab countries for their participation.


Saad Mohammed Alarify, Head of the Saudi Mission to the EU, poses for a group photo during the Catwalk event in Brussels. (Social media)

“Thank you from the bottom of my heart to all the brothers and sisters, the ambassadors of accredited Arab countries, the Libyan school and its staff, the mayor of Madrid and those in charge of Rotero Park for your active participation in the event. Together we save endangered cats, ”he wrote.

From Riyadh to the colder climates of Europe, there were many walkers and AlUla participants organized a special event in support of the Arabian leopard.

The AlUla walk took place in the Sharaan Protected Nature Reserve, where residents, visitors and staff of the Royal Commission for AlUla gathered to show their support for the critically endangered big cat, including less of 200 are believed to be living in the wild.

URC has already committed $ 25 million to the Arabian Leopard Fund, an independent organization launched by the commission to work across the leopard’s home range to save the species.


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Celebrating wildlife photographers – the Standard https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/celebrating-wildlife-photographers-the-standard/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/celebrating-wildlife-photographers-the-standard/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 12:36:06 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/celebrating-wildlife-photographers-the-standard/ African Wildlife Foundation CEO Kaddu Sebunya poses for a photo with the winners from Kenya alongside former First Lady of the United Republic of Tanzania Madam Anna Mkapa and Cabinet Secretary of Tourism Najib Balala Sixteen wildlife photographers were honored last week by the African Wildlife Foundation during its 60th anniversary celebration at the Kenya […]]]>

African Wildlife Foundation CEO Kaddu Sebunya poses for a photo with the winners from Kenya alongside former First Lady of the United Republic of Tanzania Madam Anna Mkapa and Cabinet Secretary of Tourism Najib Balala

Sixteen wildlife photographers were honored last week by the African Wildlife Foundation during its 60th anniversary celebration at the Kenya National Museum. The Benjamin Mkapa African Wildlife Photography Awards received nearly 9,000 nominations from 50 countries around the world, including 10 countries in Africa.

Grand Prize winner Riccardo Marchegiani of Italy received a cash prize equivalent to Sh 555,476 for his “Gelada and Baby” photo taken in Simien Mountains National Park, Ethiopia.

The photographer will also be featured in an interview with Nature’s Best Photography magazine, as well as an article in a special edition dedicated to the Benjamin Mkapa African Wildlife Photography Awards.

The winners of the other categories each received $ 1,000 (111,095 shillings) and a Shona elephant sculpture and will also be featured in the special edition of Nature’s Best Photography.

These include James Lewin from Kenya who was celebrated in the “Coexistence and Conflict” category for the photo “Elephant Orphans from Reteti Elephant Sanctuary” taken at Painted Rock in Samburu; Buddhilini de Soyza from Australia for the African Wildlife Behavior category photo “Cheetahs swimming through the Talek River”, taken in the Masai Mara National Reserve.

The other winners were Ingrid Vekemans from Belgium for the photo of the category “Wildlife at risk” “Battle of white rhinoceroses” taken in the Solio game reserve; Olli Teirilla from Finland for his ‘Africa in Motion’ category video, ‘Magical Maasai Mara’, shot in the Masai Mara National Reserve.

The inaugural photography competition was launched earlier this year to honor former Tanzanian President Benjamin Mkapa, for his role as an iconic environmentalist and one of AWF’s longest-serving board members.

“The growing need to hear more African voices from all disciplines speaking on behalf of wildlife and wild lands on the global stage has been identified. These young voices are actively proposing practical solutions adapted to technological advances, and we must not rule them out at all, ”said Najib Balala, Tourism and Wildlife CS.


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Community wildlife conservation programs should go beyond meetings, self-help projects and arrests of poachers https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/community-wildlife-conservation-programs-should-go-beyond-meetings-self-help-projects-and-arrests-of-poachers/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/community-wildlife-conservation-programs-should-go-beyond-meetings-self-help-projects-and-arrests-of-poachers/#respond Thu, 28 Oct 2021 22:44:55 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/community-wildlife-conservation-programs-should-go-beyond-meetings-self-help-projects-and-arrests-of-poachers/ The Chronicle Zulu MahlabezuluA number of approaches have been used to safeguard different natural resources. The use and vulnerability depend mainly on its social and economic value. The considerably more valuable wildlife has generated a lot of interest as parties involved try to apply different approaches to ensure it is protected. It is unfortunate that […]]]>

The Chronicle

Zulu Mahlabezulu
A number of approaches have been used to safeguard different natural resources. The use and vulnerability depend mainly on its social and economic value.

The considerably more valuable wildlife has generated a lot of interest as parties involved try to apply different approaches to ensure it is protected. It is unfortunate that some wild species like the number of animals decrease because humans still target them as a means of survival or alter their habitats.

Through research, these wildlife species have been classified as ‘Endangered’ or ‘Rare’ e.g. Painted Dog, Rhinoceros, Pangolin and many more

Various platforms have been used to promote the coexistence of humans and wildlife, they help protect wildlife whose continued existence will ultimately benefit humans. Conservation education programs in schools as well as other institutes of higher education, and arrests of poachers are some of the approaches that have been used.

Depending on the approach and the environment in which these wildlife conservation programs are carried out, some of the approaches have become successful as poaching records in the targeted areas have been drastically reduced and wildlife conservation is improved. become part of the culture of the community, for example. for example, community leaders or individuals who lead wildlife conservation programs in their respective communities. Some of these platforms have been found to be more effective than others.

Community meetings are mainly held to exchange ideas on how to interact with wildlife, self-help projects protect communities so that they do not put a lot of pressure on wildlife for survival, the Conservation education in communities and learning institutes are intended to instill a sense of responsibility through a change of mindset.

Sometimes the local community members of the neighboring safari, national park or forest area are always given priority when it comes to employment opportunities by different related organizations – for anyone who would have had the opportunity to be employed by that avenue, it will be like biting your tail if you don’t play a central role in wildlife conservation.

Unlike abroad, where some species of wildlife are kept in captivity, such as in zoos to educate the public on their importance, we have few wildlife orphanages locally like Chipangali Wildlife Orphanage. A number of wildlife species are kept in zoos as “animal ambassadors” – these are samples of animals that represent other animals of the same species.

It is unfortunate that some species such as baboons, due to their huge population, have been considered to be of no “conservation value”, that is, their population does not warrant conservation and their uncontrollable behavior deprives them of their potential. the possibility of being exhibited in these zoos. .

It is good that in these zoos educational programs help the public to understand and love the wildlife by seeing and sometimes touching these animals, for example a turtle, chameleon, harmless snakes and this has sometimes reduced the phobia of the animals. people.

As proof, we have seen how the people of these countries recount or admire the beauty of our wild animals which they see in the wildlife protected areas of our country.

While this method can be considered one of the best methods of bringing people closer to wildlife compared to other approaches that can be used to conserve wildlife, it is unfortunate that a similar program could be used, but the approach is not popular in our country, for example, an annual program in which some representatives of the surrounding wildlife community may be offered game viewing opportunities in a game reserve or park.

In this case, the team will have the opportunity to admire the beauty of the wildlife they are encouraged to conserve. If people have such an opportunity, they will see some of those rare species that do not visit human habitats, for example, painted dogs and sands.

Although this is considered to be one of the effective methods for communities to understand wildlife, it is unfortunate that a few organizations are using it. It is a good thing that some of the wildlife organizations have introduced interactive nature activities for children in their centers, and these activities have brought this target group closer to understanding wildlife and the importance of its conservation. .

From our experiences as human beings, we have longtime neighbors whom we sometimes visit and share ideas – such visits bring understanding and bond between us through knowing family members.

Some of these community-based wildlife conservation approaches used are like trying to create a bond “between you and your neighbor about whom you don’t know much”, for example, introducing a self-help project whose goal is to conserve wild life.

Due to the lack of resources, most of the community members do not have the opportunity to visit and see the beauty of the wildlife and these communities are not aware of some of the species of wildlife that are found. in nearby wildlife protected areas, as some of the wild animal species the species rarely approach human habitats.

Offering such a program where the community has the opportunity to visit wildlife sanctuaries through activities like game viewing will be a motivating way to encourage them to conserve wildlife – it will create a good bond between communities and wildlife.

Although the expense of carrying out such an activity is a stumbling block for wildlife conservation projects, a joint venture program for these communities can be organized and this would involve various stakeholders, i.e. that is, the exclusion of the payment of park fees by the responsible authority, the provision of an ideal vehicle and the necessary provisions by others.

It is very beneficial for wildlife stakeholders who participate in wildlife conservation programs in some communities to realize that joint venture programs are sometimes important and effective – this also avoids duplication programs which sometimes will not be successful. effective!

* Mahlabezulu Zulu is an environmentalist who has worked for various wildlife research and conservation organizations in Hwange and Fuller Forestry National Parks in Victoria Falls.

He can be reached on 00263 (0) 713269827/0776196171. E-mail [email protected] Where [email protected]


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Local Wildlife Conservation is home to over 100 animals and arranges tours https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/local-wildlife-conservation-is-home-to-over-100-animals-and-arranges-tours/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/local-wildlife-conservation-is-home-to-over-100-animals-and-arranges-tours/#respond Wed, 27 Oct 2021 14:30:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/local-wildlife-conservation-is-home-to-over-100-animals-and-arranges-tours/ For the first eight years of her life, Gaby lived in a 4ft by 6ft roller cage in a traveling zoo – well below the legal requirements to house a tiger. But Gaby was rescued by the Carson Springs Wildlife Conservation Foundation in 2011. Now the striped beige tiger is frolic in its 6,500 square […]]]>

For the first eight years of her life, Gaby lived in a 4ft by 6ft roller cage in a traveling zoo – well below the legal requirements to house a tiger.

But Gaby was rescued by the Carson Springs Wildlife Conservation Foundation in 2011. Now the striped beige tiger is frolic in its 6,500 square foot enclosure.

The non-profit foundation is home to more than 100 animals, including around 30 endangered species. Established in 2008, the Gainesville-based foundation saves and houses exotic animals, with the goal of supporting wildlife conservation and educating the public with weekly tours.

“Our mission is not just to house the animals; it’s to educate, ”said Barry Janks, co-founder of the foundation.

The foundation organized one of its wild adventure open house events on October 2 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. It hosted more than 1,200 people to tour the wildlife sanctuary, Janks said. The event raised approximately 10% of the foundation’s annual operating expenses through donations from visitors. His annual budget comes from tours, private donors and Janks’ own pockets, he said.

The organization is licensed by Alachua County, the US Department of Agriculture, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The facility is inspected at least twice a year and has never been cited for violation, he said.

“People come here and they’re actually shocked at how nice our establishment is,” he said.

Huey, a spotted hyena, is pictured here.

Rescues like Gaby are brought to the sanctuary by USDA, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, zoos and other animal sanctuaries that have gone bankrupt or failed to provide good living conditions, a- he declared.

After her past as a show tiger, Gaby was initially shy and reluctant to interact with the keepers.

So Janks spent the next six months visiting Gaby’s compound and talking to her, he said. Now she runs to Janks as she spots him.

The foundation began when Janks and his wife, Christine, traveled to South Africa in 2001 to work with the Ann van Dyk Cheetah Center, an organization dedicated to the conservation of cheetahs and other endangered species.

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“Cheetahs in the South African region are particularly at risk as they depend on farmers’ livestock for food and, in turn, farmers kill cheetahs,” he said.

Janks said the organization is focused on education by offering tours to the public by reservation, school group tours and opportunities for veterinary medicine students.

During the tours, visitors learn about the history of the animals, how keepers look after them on a daily basis and why protecting endangered species is vital, he said.

“Everyone who comes here talks to me and tells me it’s one of the only places they’ve been where the animals look happy,” he said. “And that makes me so proud.”

The Janks and Ann van Dyk bought land in South Africa in 2002, then opened a facility to house cheetahs and leopards until they could be moved to a safer location. Moved by the successes of the rescues, the Janks returned to the United States to open their own facility in Gainesville at 8528 E County Road 225, he said.

The facility spans 275 acres and is home to a wide variety of exotic animals, including cheetahs, lions, tigers, leopards, hyenas, caracals, lynxes, and pumas. The animals are given food, large enclosures and proper veterinary care, said Kaitlyn Gvozden, carnivore keeper at the foundation.

Gator is a tiger who comes from a petting center for pups, where he was starved for the first year of his life to maintain a weight below the legal limit for pups’ interaction with the public, he said. she declared.

“At one year old, a tiger is supposed to weigh around 200 pounds,” Gvozden said. “When 11-month-old Gator was brought to the foundation, he weighed only 70 pounds and was severely emaciated. He was not expected to live.

The foundation fought for Gator’s life by providing him with proper medical care and food. The guards eventually brought Gator back to health, and he now weighs 450 pounds, she said.

Wren Andrews, 25-year-old primary caretaker of the carnivores, said stories like Gator’s were the reason she was drawn to the foundation.

“I have heard so many stories of big cats being used as pets, put in circuses and abused,” she said. “Helping them get back to normal life is really rewarding. “

The foundation is also home to Henry, the oldest male Indian rhino in the world. The 40-year-old, 4,600-pound rhino was brought to the foundation after retiring as a father for conservation purposes, Gvozden said.

Kaylee Henley, another wildlife guardian, said she admires the foundation’s dedication to educating others about endangered species and the importance of wildlife conservation.

“When it comes to the conservation of endangered animals, it is important that we act now,” she said. “If we don’t, we’ll get to a point where we can’t do anything to help the species survive. “

Jenny Rogers is a contributor to The Alligator.

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Prague workshop talks about wildlife conservation | Environment https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/prague-workshop-talks-about-wildlife-conservation-environment/ Wed, 27 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/prague-workshop-talks-about-wildlife-conservation-environment/ Certain products whose origin is the subject of warnings by the Czech authorities displayed at the workshop. (Photo: VNA) Prague (VNA) – Regulations on the transport of products made from rare plants and animals to the Czech Republic and the EU were the focus of discussions at a workshop in Prague on October 26. During […]]]>
Certain products whose origin is the subject of warnings by the Czech authorities displayed at the workshop. (Photo: VNA)

Prague (VNA) – Regulations on the transport of products made from rare plants and animals to the Czech Republic and the EU were the focus of discussions at a workshop in Prague on October 26.

During the event co-organized by the Czech Ministry of the Environment and the Czech Education Center – Vietnam in Prague, the Customs Administration of
Czech Republic detailed regulations on goods from Vietnam.

As a result, the Czech Republic has tightened controls on goods, gifts, food, nutritional supplements and traditional medicines made from rare animals and plants imported into the European country.

In his opening remarks, Czech Deputy Environment Minister Vladimir Dolejsky said the event aimed to better understand the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in order to help raise public awareness of environmental protection and the conservation of rare animals.

Speakers argued that many wild and rare species have become extinct in the wild or are currently on the verge of extinction due to climate change, habitat loss, and in particular poaching and trafficking.

They noted that each wild species contributes to biodiversity and natural balance, thus helping to prevent natural disasters. The disappearance of one species will upset the balance of nature and lead to subsequent impacts on other species, including humans.

Participants proposed several solutions to conserve endangered species and biodiversity, including preventing wildlife trafficking and reducing human-caused environmental destruction. /.

VNA


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Oil and natural gas extraction is not ‘mining’, says Panel for Wildlife Conservation https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/oil-and-natural-gas-extraction-is-not-mining-says-panel-for-wildlife-conservation/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/oil-and-natural-gas-extraction-is-not-mining-says-panel-for-wildlife-conservation/#respond Fri, 22 Oct 2021 02:30:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/oil-and-natural-gas-extraction-is-not-mining-says-panel-for-wildlife-conservation/ New Delhi: A wildlife conservation organization under the government of Narendra Modi exempted oil and gas extraction from the definition of “mining” activity, paving the way for widespread exploitation of hydrocarbons in and around some of the densest forests in India which are also extremely rich with flora and fauna. The move, which is part […]]]>

New Delhi: A wildlife conservation organization under the government of Narendra Modi exempted oil and gas extraction from the definition of “mining” activity, paving the way for widespread exploitation of hydrocarbons in and around some of the densest forests in India which are also extremely rich with flora and fauna. The move, which is part of a series of environmental regulatory reforms vis-à-vis the hydrocarbon sector, will potentially benefit the bigwigs in the oil and gas industry.

At a meeting – details of which were released on October 8 – the National Wildlife Board (NBWL) Standing Committee provided the latest authorisation to six proposals to divert forest land from the Trishna Wildlife Sanctuary in Tripura after deciding that oil extraction cannot be considered “mining” activity.

The exemption was granted after senior justice officials in the country, including Tripura’s Advocate General and India’s Solicitor General, respectively, felt that oil extraction could not be interpreted as a “mining exploitation” within the framework of mines and minerals (development and regulation). Law of 1957 – known as the MMDR law – or under a 2006 Supreme Court order that banned mining near protected areas.

“What has been conveniently ignored when exempting oil and gas extraction from the definition of mining activities is the Mining Law of 1952. This law defines petroleum extraction as a mining activity.” said environmental lawyer Ritwick Dutta. NewsClick.

The 1952 Mining Act, which NBWL allegedly ignored in making its decision, defines mining as “any excavation where an operation to search for or obtain minerals has been or is in progress and includes all the drilling, boreholes, oil wells and ancillary crude-conditioning plants, including the pipe carrying the oil mineral in oil fields ”.

According to the minutes of the NBWL standing committee meeting, the Solicitor General of India considered that the extraction of natural gas and petroleum, which includes exploration and development, is “not a business. mining versus traditional surface mining carried out over a large expanse of land ”.

The Solicitor General further added that oil and gas exploration could not be considered mining within the meaning of the Supreme Court order issued in August 2006 in the famous Godavarman Thirumulpad case according to which mining activities had been prohibited, provisionally, within a radius of 1 km from all protected areas, including national parks, wildlife reserves and forests.

“The spirit of the Supreme Court order of August 2006 was not taken into account to exempt the extraction of hydrocarbons from the definition of mining. By banning mining activities within a 1 km radius of protected areas, the decree aims to create a safety zone or buffer zone in which no disturbance should take place for the benefit of wildlife and ecology.

The Baghjan oil well explosion, which took place last year, is a case in point. The oil well is located at a distance of less than 1 km outside the boundaries of the Dibru Saikhowa National Park, a protected area, where most of the damage has taken place, ”added Dutta, whose organization LIFE (Legal Initiative for the Forest and the Environment), has been selected for the Right Livelihood Award 2021.

The Supreme Court has trained an expert Committee to analyze, among other things, any breaches, if any, of the authorization of the large state-owned company Oil India Limited to extract hydrocarbons very close to the Dibru Saikhowa National Park in Baghjan, Assam. Therefore, NBWL’s decision to facilitate oil and natural gas extraction activities near protected areas by removing it from the definition of mining was also characterized as premature.

Despite the devastation caused by the Baghjan eruption in the ecologically fragile rainforests of Assam, which also resulted in shift and the loss of the livelihoods of a large number of local communities, the Modi government has recently made efforts to relax environmental standards for the exploitation of hydrocarbons.

In January 2020, before the eruption of Baghjan, the Modi government had exempt oil and gas exploration activities by conducting public hearings, carrying out environmental impact studies and obtaining environmental authorizations from the Union’s Ministry of the Environment, Forests and Climate Change.

In May 2020, shortly before the eruption of Baghjan, the Union’s Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change had erased Oil India Limited (OIL) proposal for seven exploration wells outside Dibru Saikhowa National Park without a biodiversity impact assessment. In August 2020, even as the Baghjan eruption fire was still raging, a public interest dispute was filed in the Gauhati High Court alleging that the Modi government had exempted the aforementioned project from authorization. environmental impact in a “retrospective” manner.

Earlier this month, the Modi government sought to exempt hydrocarbon exploitation from the scope of forest clearing through a project amendment of the Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980, whenever undertaken with the assistance of Extended Reach Drilling (DER) Technology.

It has been argued that these reforms, which can benefit oil companies, will also lead to irreversible environmental devastation.

At the same time, NBWL’s legal competence was also called into question by exempting the extraction of oil and natural gas from the definition of mining. Only the central government is empowered to exempt any activity of the 1952 Mining Act, which was put in place for the regulation of work and safety in mines.

“Where was the doctrine of proportionality, according to which the administrative action is legitimately expected to have a reasonable relation to the general purpose for which the power was conferred when the wildlife council exempted the extraction?” of hydrocarbons from the definition of mining? It seems that the aspects of environmental and ecological conservation, the objective for which the board of directors was first constituted, were not taken into account in arriving at this decision ”, said Debajit Das, lawyer. environment based in Gauhati.

In January 2019, NBWL provided conditions authorisation to the large public sector company Oil & Natural Gas Corporation (ONGC) for diverting forest land from the Trishna Wildlife Sanctuary in Tripura for its hydrocarbon mining project. The proposed construction activities for the Trishna gas project included the drilling site, garbage pit, gas transport pipelines and access roads against which ONGC had requested wildlife clearance for six different plots of land. forest.

NBWL had approved all six proposals, but with a set of conditions intended for environmental mitigation. The NBWL had also ruled:

“The state government [Tripura] must obtain a legal opinion from the Advocate General on the fact that the extraction of natural gas / oil cannot be considered as mining under the terms of the order of the Supreme Court of 4.8.2006 in IA-1000 in WPC-202/1995 (Godavarman vs Union of India). The Ministry [Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas] will also have to seek legal advice from the Solicitor General of India on similar lines.

According to experts, a buffer zone or safety zone even outside protected areas, where commercial activities, including mining, are prohibited, helps prevent human-animal conflict as it is impossible to restrict the movement of wild animals within man-made boundaries of parks and sanctuaries.

Another example is Kaziranga National Park. A committee of experts formed by the government of Assam had advised the delimitation of nine corridors, beyond the limits of Kaziranga National Park, to allow the free back and forth movement of wild animals towards the neighboring hills of Karbi Anglong.

Residents of Kaziranga National Park – including tigers, elephants and rhinos – migrate to the hills of Karbi Anglong during the annual floods in order to seek refuge. However, their movements are hampered by the national road (NH) 37, which splits the park into two zones, and the commercial activities adjacent to the road.

Following a Supreme Court order in April 2019, the government of Assam also imposed a to prohibit on all mining activities in the immediate vicinity of Kaziranga National Park in order to promote the free movement of wild animals. The government of Assam issued the following statement on April 30, 2019:

“It is hereby ordered that all types of mining and related activities along the southern boundary of PNK [Kaziranga National Park] and throughout the watershed rivers, streams and streams flowing from the Karbi Anglong hill ranges and flowing into the PNK is immediately banned.

The writer is a freelance journalist.


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Wildlife conservation – The Kashmir Monitor https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/wildlife-conservation-the-kashmir-monitor/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/wildlife-conservation-the-kashmir-monitor/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 13:41:31 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/wildlife-conservation-the-kashmir-monitor/ Every year, Wildlife Week is celebrated across India from October 2-8 with the aim of protecting and preserving the flora and fauna of India. The first Wildlife Week was observed in 1957. Wildlife Week 2021 is celebrated from October 2-8, 2021. Wildlife Week 2021 marks the 67th Wildlife Week which is celebrated under the theme […]]]>

Every year, Wildlife Week is celebrated across India from October 2-8 with the aim of protecting and preserving the flora and fauna of India. The first Wildlife Week was observed in 1957. Wildlife Week 2021 is celebrated from October 2-8, 2021. Wildlife Week 2021 marks the 67th Wildlife Week which is celebrated under the theme Forests and livelihoods: supporting people and the planet. During this week, experts are holding workshops to educate people on the importance of wildlife conservation. In addition to this, several awareness activities are organized at different levels to educate people about wildlife. Last week, Lieutenant Governor Manoj Sinha also inaugurated Wildlife Week-2021 at SKICC in Srinagar. The lieutenant governor also inaugurated the online entry authorization for Dachigam National Park and the Hangul ecological stop near Parimahal. He also published the Hangul census report and brochures on trekking routes. The LG said that J & K’s wildlife has rich and rare assets in the form of its flora and fauna, biodiversity and wildlife sanctuaries, and the government is paying special attention to the conservation and protection of invaluable natural resources. The role played by wildlife in maintaining the ecological balance of nature is undeniable. Any damage to nature can pose a threat to the entire ecosystem. Thus, it is very important to preserve flora and fauna. Animals and plants that live in the wild have intrinsic value and contribute to ecological, genetic, social, economic, scientific, educational, cultural, recreational and aesthetic aspects of human well-being and sustainable development. World Wildlife Day is an opportunity to celebrate the many beautiful and diverse forms of wild flora and fauna and to raise awareness of the multitude of benefits that their conservation provides to people. At the same time, the Day reminds us of the urgent need to step up the fight against wildlife crime and human-induced species reduction, which have far-reaching economic, environmental and social impacts. In Kashmir, the biggest problem right now has been human-animal conflict. It was not a pleasant season for Wildlife Front Line workers and animal rescue teams, as incidents of human-animal conflict kept them going. Deforestation and the unplanned expansion of residential and commercial buildings have reduced the natural habitat of these wild animals. As humans trampled and occupied their spaces, it is only natural that more and more incidents of human-animal conflict occur. Official data shows that at least 33 people have lost their lives in various incidents of human-wildlife conflict over the past four years across Kashmir. Likewise, 498 people have been injured in the past four years in the region. Human-wildlife conflict refers to an interaction between wildlife and humans and the resulting negative impact on humans or their resources, or wildlife or their habitat. Human-wildlife conflict occurs when the needs of wildlife overlap with those of human populations, creating costs for both residents and wildlife. In recent times, the valley has seen a peak of such incidents. According to wildlife experts, there are many reasons contributing to human-animal conflict. One of them being the change in agricultural land use over the years in rural and semi-urban areas from traditional crops (paddy) to cash crops (fruits, mainly apples). This attracts bears who get good quality food and large quantities from an orchard, rather than the forest. A study titled Victims of Human-Wildlife Conflict in the Kashmir Valley, India; a neglected form of trauma: our 10-year study reveals that in human-animal conflicts, the bear was the animal most often responsible for the human-animal conflict, followed by the leopard.


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