Wildlife conservation – Rio Grande Delta Audubon http://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 08:32:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-50x50.png Wildlife conservation – Rio Grande Delta Audubon http://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/ 32 32 The Cheetah Project is the government’s effort for environmental and wildlife conservation: PM https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/the-cheetah-project-is-the-governments-effort-for-environmental-and-wildlife-conservation-pm/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 08:32:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/the-cheetah-project-is-the-governments-effort-for-environmental-and-wildlife-conservation-pm/ Sheopur (Madhya Pradesh): Prime Minister Narendra Modi said on Saturday that “Project Cheetah”, under which the BJP government in the Center has reintroduced big cats to the country with the support of Namibia, is the government’s push for the environmental and wildlife conservation. Prime Minister Modi, in an address to the nation after the release […]]]>

Sheopur (Madhya Pradesh): Prime Minister Narendra Modi said on Saturday that “Project Cheetah”, under which the BJP government in the Center has reintroduced big cats to the country with the support of Namibia, is the government’s push for the environmental and wildlife conservation.

Prime Minister Modi, in an address to the nation after the release of cheetahs in Kuno National Park on Saturday, said: “We lose some things when we move away from our roots. Therefore, we should be proud of our heritage.

The Prime Minister thanked the Namibian government for its cooperation in relocating eight cheetahs to India and also congratulated Indian citizens for the successful release of the cheetahs in Kuno National Park.

He said the cheetahs will add to biodiversity, boost tourism and generate income for locals.

“The biodiversity that was extinct and the bond that disconnected for decades, today we have a chance to reconnect it. Today the cheetah has returned to the soil of India. And I would say also that with these cheetahs, the nature-loving consciousness of India has also been awakened with full force,” Prime Minister Modi said.

He added that Kuno National Park was chosen for the release of the cheetahs after a detailed study by experts.

“It is unfortunate that we declared the country’s cheetahs extinct in 1952, but for decades no significant effort has been made to rehabilitate them. Today, as we celebrate Azadi ka Amrit Mahotsav, the country has begun to rehabilitate cheetahs with new energy,” the PM said.

The Prime Minister said the grassland ecosystem will once again be restored and biodiversity will increase further.
“It is true that when nature and the environment are protected, our future is also secure. The paths to growth and prosperity are also opened. When the cheetahs run again in Kuno National Park, the The grassland ecosystem will be restored again and biodiversity will increase further,” Prime Minister Modi said.

Prime Minister Modi called on people to be patient before visiting Kuno National Park to catch a glimpse of the cheetahs and called them “guests of India”.

“These cheetahs came as guests, ignoring this area. In order for them to settle in Kuno National Park, we will have to give these cheetahs a few months. In line with international guidelines, India is doing its best better to settle these cheetahs. We must not let our efforts fail,” the prime minister said.

“India was removed from the list of natural habitats for cheetahs decades ago, we must make efforts to regain this place,” he said.
Emphasizing that India in the 21st century is giving a message to the world that economy and ecology are not contradictory fields and said, “For us it is also the basis of our sensibility and spirituality.”

“This is a historic moment. Cheetahs will make us more environmentally conscious,” he added.

Cheetahs were declared extinct from India in 1952, but today 8 cheetahs (5 females and 3 males) have been brought from African Namibia as part of the ‘Cheetah Project’ and government efforts to revitalize and diversify the country’s wildlife and habitat.
The eight cheetahs were brought on a cargo plane to Gwalior as part of an intercontinental cheetah transfer project. Later, Indian Air Force helicopters transported the cheetahs to Kuno National Park from Gwalior Air Force Station.
Radio collars were fitted to all the cheetahs to be monitored by satellite. Other than that, there is a dedicated monitoring team behind each cheetah who will monitor their location for 24 hours.
The Cheetahs were subject to a memorandum of understanding signed earlier this year.

As part of the Indian government’s ambitious Cheetah Project, the reintroduction of wildlife species, especially the cheetah, has been undertaken in accordance with the guidelines of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

India has a long history of wildlife conservation. One of the most successful wildlife conservation ventures, “Project Tiger”, which was started in 1972, has not only contributed to the conservation of tigers but also of the whole ecosystem.

In continuation of this, the reintroduction of cheetahs is a step forward and a milestone in the history of wildlife conservation in India.

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PM Modi – The New Indian Express https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/pm-modi-the-new-indian-express/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 07:22:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/pm-modi-the-new-indian-express/ By PTI SHEOPUR: Prime Minister Narendra Modi said on Saturday that the Cheetah project, under which the big cats were reintroduced to the country after their extinction seven decades ago, is his government’s effort to conserve the environment and wildlife. Modi was speaking after release of cheetahs by air from Namibia to special enclosures in […]]]>

By PTI

SHEOPUR: Prime Minister Narendra Modi said on Saturday that the Cheetah project, under which the big cats were reintroduced to the country after their extinction seven decades ago, is his government’s effort to conserve the environment and wildlife.

Modi was speaking after release of cheetahs by air from Namibia to special enclosures in Kuno National Park in Madhya Pradesh.

Modi, who turned 72 on Saturday, released three of the eight cheetahs, which made the transcontinental flight, into an enclosure by flipping a lever.

The Prime Minister said it was unfortunate that “we declared the cheetah extinct in 1952, but for decades no constructive effort was made to reintroduce it”.

SEE PHOTOS | PM Modi releases eight Namibian cheetahs in Kuno National Park

He thanked the Namibian government for its assistance in the cheetah reintroduction program in India.

“The Cheetah project, under which cheetahs were reintroduced to the country after their disappearance seven decades ago, is our effort for environmental and wildlife conservation,” he said.

“The cheetahs are our guests, we should give them a few months to settle in Kuno National Park,” Modi said.

LOOK:

Coverage of protected areas has increased from 4.90% to 5.03% of the country’s geographical area since the government led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi came to power in 2014, officials said on Saturday.

Highlighting the government’s wildlife conservation efforts, they said there were 740 protected areas covering 1,61,081.62 km2 in 2014 and the number is now 981 with an area of ​​1,71,921 km2.

During the day, Modi released eight cheetahs brought from Namibia into Kuno National Park in Madhya Pradesh to boost the country’s wildlife.

Forest and tree cover has increased by 16,000 km2 over the past four years.

India is one of the few countries in the world where forest cover is constantly increasing, they said.

“There has also been an increase in the number of community reserves. From 43 in 2014, their number has increased to more than 100 in 2019,” an official said.

READ ALSO | ‘Cheetah releases tamasha orchestrated by PM to avoid national problems’: Congress

India is home to 52 tiger reserves covering an area of ​​around 75,000 km² in 18 states, home to around 75% of the world’s wild tiger population.

The country met the target of doubling the number of tigers in 2018 itself, four years ahead of the target year of 2022, officials noted.

The tiger population in India has increased from 2,226 in 2014 to 2,967 in 2018.

The budget allocation for tiger conservation has increased from Rs 185 crore in 2014 to Rs 300 crore in 2022, officials said.

The Asiatic lion population has also shown a steady increase with a population of 674 compared to 523 in 2015, an increase of 28.87% – one of the highest growth rates to date – they said.

India had 12,852 leopards up from the previous estimate of 7,910 in 2014, recording a more than 60 percent increase in their population, they noted.

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) for Wildlife Conservation | MorungExpress https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/artificial-intelligence-ai-for-wildlife-conservation-morungexpress/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 14:30:46 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/artificial-intelligence-ai-for-wildlife-conservation-morungexpress/ Mayanglambam Pooja Devi The relationship between man and nature has become increasingly unequal and abusive. Man has caused immense environmental destruction such as habitat degradation, overexploitation of natural resources, human-wildlife conflict, illegal trafficking and much more. Our planet is losing its biodiversity at an unprecedented rate. A recent report by the World Wildlife Fund (2020) […]]]>

Mayanglambam Pooja Devi

The relationship between man and nature has become increasingly unequal and abusive. Man has caused immense environmental destruction such as habitat degradation, overexploitation of natural resources, human-wildlife conflict, illegal trafficking and much more. Our planet is losing its biodiversity at an unprecedented rate. A recent report by the World Wildlife Fund (2020) suggests that since 1970, more than 20,000 populations of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles and fish have declined by an average of 68%. Many of these creatures are essential to the functioning of entire ecosystems. Given the rate of decline of the wildlife population, its conservation is of paramount importance. Fortunately, the use of technology in this area offers a glimmer of hope. Artificial intelligence (AI) is one such advanced technology. AI is a branch of computing and technology that develops intelligent machines and computer programs to perform tasks that otherwise require human intellect. We could productively think of AI as a human-made brain. Now, how does AI contribute to wildlife conservation?

Technologies such as AI-enabled drones, also known as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), are changing the dynamics of wildlife conservation. A UAV is a simple aircraft that has no human operator, crew, or passenger on board. It provides an adaptable, accurate, and cost-effective answer to technical problems related to law enforcement and conservation management. The drones are equipped with a photography system and AI (Machine Learning) software that allows the operator to plan a pre-programmed flight. Drones collect remote sensing data at fine temporal and spatial scales. With the help of drones, researchers can acquire a large volume of image-based data from a wide variety of habitats, including those that are difficult to access on foot. Compared to manned aircraft, most UAVs are smaller and quieter, making them a less intrusive option for conducting wildlife surveys.

AI-powered drones have been used for the first time in Kaziranga National Park to monitor rhino poachers. Currently, there are three drones in the park, two with the Kaziranga Police Department and one with the forest officers. Coordinated by Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), these drones now patrol the 430 km2 national park. The drones are equipped with infrared imaging cameras to track poachers operating at night, allowing better vigilance of nocturnal activities. The drones can stay in the air for 40 minutes and the images they capture can be monitored in real time. In this way, AI-equipped drones help reduce the difficulties encountered in wildlife monitoring.

AI also plays an important role in the conservation of endangered species. Many AI-based applications are used to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), namely SDGs 14 and 15 (SDGs 14 and 15 aim to conserve, restore and promote the sustainable use of “life under water” and “life on land”, respectively). Scientists assess data related to whale numbers and welfare using marine robots, remote sensing and machine learning models on Microsoft Azure. Conservationists are using AI with predictive statistical modeling to monitor Antarctic penguins in real time. WWF and Intel are working with academics to use artificial intelligence to save Siberian tigers in China. AI can thus be usefully used by researchers to identify an animal’s location, time and date of sighting, migration patterns, relative abundance, and even its social background. Gadgets, software, and AI-enabled monitoring systems are being used to track and understand repetitive animal behaviors, such as breeding patterns, feeding routes, and hunting routines.

AI also helps conservation efforts by preventing collisions between wildlife and vehicles. To minimize collisions, large mammals and pedestrians are detected using thermal cameras coupled with radar, a visual sensor and a convolutional neural network (CNN). Given a set of real-world photographs or videos, this AI model learns to automatically generate input properties to achieve a given goal, such as identifying an image, object, or face. One such technology is StradVision (a pioneer in AI-based vision processing technology for autonomous vehicles) which is modeled on deep learning-based SVNet software.

AI can also help predict forest fires. There are several AI programs that analyze high-resolution satellite images to predict the intensity of wildlife burning, then coordinate with the data to help with fire forecasting.

Additionally, AI can be effectively deployed as an early warning system against poaching. : WildEyes is one such system that uses simulated data models to track mammals such as elephants and rhinos. AI algorithms are also designed to spot wildlife species or features, such as horns or scales, that exist in an image or video, while identifying the environment in which they appear, such as habitat. natural or a market.

Although AI has the ability to be a useful tool for wildlife conservation, there are some challenges that need to be considered. Drones are limited by the very qualities that make them desirable. They have limited durability and any technical error can lead to a complicated and costly crash. Due to the complications of using thermal imaging technology, they can be difficult to use. In India, where staff members struggle to access minimum requirements such as proper footwear and clothing, drone use still has a long way to go. These technologies can also lead to poor relations between locals and conservation authorities if they are not properly introduced to the technology. In particular, when used in remote areas of developing countries where people have had little exposure to electronic devices, these technologies can raise doubts, conspiracy theories and suspicions. Accordingly, the introduction of “responsible AI”, which outlines general procedures for ethical approval and provides relevant guidance on an algorithm and its limitations, is something that can be advocated. And for this, conservationists, AI researchers and local communities must work hand in hand.

Clearly, AI technologies are having a significant impact in the field of wildlife conservation. Due to the development of several services for AI, conservation efforts are now significantly more informed and efficient. AI sheds light on various ways to protect life forms by providing massive data on what is happening to wildlife. With its advancements, many interesting possibilities are now available. However, this will only be beneficial if the AI ​​models are trained efficiently using the appropriate machine learning datasets. As humans learn to balance their progress with the demands of wildlife, AI tools have arrived at a favorable time to enable sustainable coexistence between humans and animals. It is therefore crucial to continue research on AI as a revolutionary solution to environmental challenges.

The writer works as a lecturer at the University of Plaksha

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Fuel shortage forces wildlife conservation department to scale back operations https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/fuel-shortage-forces-wildlife-conservation-department-to-scale-back-operations/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/fuel-shortage-forces-wildlife-conservation-department-to-scale-back-operations/ Maheshakya has been widely recognized as an exemplary specimen of an elephant, with large tusks. He roamed the wilderness of Kebithigollewa in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka. Maheshakya got into a fight earlier this year with another elephant, which left him seriously injured. Even as he lay in pain, still alive and conscious, […]]]>

Maheshakya has been widely recognized as an exemplary specimen of an elephant, with large tusks. He roamed the wilderness of Kebithigollewa in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka. Maheshakya got into a fight earlier this year with another elephant, which left him seriously injured. Even as he lay in pain, still alive and conscious, a poacher cut off one of his tusks. Twenty days later, Mahesakya was dead.

Since the tusker suffered his injuries in the fight, Department of Wildlife Conservation vets have only been able to check him twice. Prior to this year, Maheshakya would have received many more visits, possibly preventing the loss of his defense and his subsequent death. But Sri Lanka’s current economic crisis, the worst in the country’s history, meant that was not going to happen.

“If we had more opportunities to care for the elephant and visit him frequently, there was a chance to save his life. But we had no fuel in our vehicles to make this trip regularly,” said said Chandana Jayasinghe, a veterinary vet with the Department of Wildlife Conservation.

Sri Lanka has declared bankruptcy and lacks foreign exchange reserves to import essential goods for its people, such as medicine, fuel and gas. Mile-long queues at gas stations have become a permanent scene across the country, and although a rationing system is helping to shorten waiting times, the little fuel available is not enough. so that wildlife officials can do their regular job. This leaves response teams, like the one Jayasinghe works on, often unable to go on rescue missions.

A man queues to buy gasoline in Colombo in June. Credit: Reuters.

Rescue operations affected

Certain public services such as health, public order and public transport have been declared essential services by the government and, as such, the ministries and government agencies that administer them are granted priority access to fuel. But the Department of Wildlife Conservation does not fall into this category, so its staff has to queue like all other motorists.

“Due to the fuel shortage, we think twice about taking on a case,” says Akalanka Pinidiya, a veterinarian with the Department of Wildlife Conservation in central Sri Lanka.

When an elephant death is reported, the usual procedure is to carry out an autopsy to determine the cause of death. But due to the need to save fuel for rescue missions, officials are now largely forgoing the need for autopsies, Pinidiya told Mongabay.

“Apart from elephants, the department receives a handful of other animals such as birds, small cats, porcupines and barking deer sent from regional offices for processing. But that has stopped now,” says Pinidiya .

Range offices are also facing fuel shortages, and residents who would usually hand over injured animals themselves have more pressing needs to meet rather than trying to rescue animals in distress, Pinidiya says.

The Department of Wildlife Conservation operates a number of wildlife rescue centers which house and care for injured animals. These operations have also been hard hit by the fuel shortage. The Attidiya Wildlife Rehabilitation Center on the outskirts of Colombo now only handles essential rescues.

“Usually our vehicle will pick up animals in distress when we receive a call. But now the center has to ask people to bring in injured animals to keep the limited fuel available and save it for critical cases,” says Suhada Jayawardena, a veterinarian at the rehabilitation center.

The center recently received a phone call from the Wellawatte district of Colombo, less than 20 minutes’ drive away, about a turtle with a damaged fin. Even though it was only six kilometers from the center, there was no way to get there.

Help came from Coast Guard personnel stationed in Wellawatte, who secured a supply of fuel for “essential service” and delivered the turtle to the rescue center. But the vast majority of animals in need are not so lucky.

“People inform us that animals need help with good intentions and it is heartbreaking to refuse their requests or ignore them. The idea is to help each animal if possible, not to select,” explains Jayawardena.

A member of the wildlife department loads a dead sea turtle that washed up on a beach weeks after a container ship caught fire and sank off Colombo, Panadura in Sri Lanka in June 2021. Credit : Reuters.

Wildlife officers, like all Sri Lankans, face serious difficulties getting to work every day. Many have taken up cycling if the journey is not too far; Jayawardena cycles the 8 km that separate her home from the rescue centre.

“This is an unprecedented level of crisis that triggers other crises such as rescue operations that are hampered,” said Chandana Sooriyabandara, chief executive of DWC. “Some of our services are severely [restricted] by the fuel crisis, but we are still trying to find fuel for the cases that are essential to treat. »

Earlier this year, the Department of Wildlife Conservation allocated fuel quotas for various purposes from its annual budget, prepared just as the economic crisis deepened. Since then, fuel has become scarce and prices have doubled. This effectively halved the quotas determined by the Department of Wildlife Conservation, in turn forcing a reduction in rescue operations.

“We have sent directives to use fuel efficiently and to increase foot patrols to address poaching issues,” Sooriyabandara said. mongabay.

This does not bode well for Sri Lanka, the country with the highest rate of human-elephant conflict. Hostile encounters between humans and pachyderms kill some 300 elephants and 50 people a year. These conflicts often stem from elephants entering villages and eating farmers’ crops. Wildlife officers are usually on call to intervene and chase them away.

But the fuel shortage has drastically reduced this vital commitment, putting both villagers and elephants at greater risk of injury or even death due to lack of professional intervention, says Ms Peiris, president of a national union wildlife wardens.

A delay of just one hour in taking preventive action can be costly. In a recent incident in Saliyapura, North Central Province, an elephant reportedly entered the village and killed one person and injured another. The wildlife office near Saliyapura said it did not have enough fuel to send officers to the village to hunt the elephant, says Peiris mongabay.

Due to the lack of patrols, large scale gem mining is taking place in Yala National Park (pictured) in Sri Lanka. Credit: Patty Ho, uploaded to Wikimedia Commons by Lkcl_it, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons.

Increase in illegal activity

The lack of patrols has also led to an increase in illegal activities in protected areas, according to Sajeewa Chamikara, an environmental activist with the Movement for Land and Agricultural Reform.

In Yala National Park in southern Sri Lanka, for example, large-scale gem mining is carried out illegally in the absence of patrols.

Meanwhile, Sri Lanka has entered forest fire season, when poachers and forest invaders start fires to flush out animals which they then kill or capture. Most of these forests fall under the management of the DWC, but with the shortage of fuel, “this will delay their ability to respond quickly,” says Chamikara.

“We should expect the economic crisis to have an impact on conservation, as people who lose their livelihoods would tend to poach animals. [as a nutritional] supplement and also to earn money,” says Rukshan Jayawardene, an environmentalist with the Environmental Foundation Limited, a non-profit organization based in Colombo.

Against this backdrop, law enforcement activities should be stepped up rather than reduced, and the Department of Wildlife Conservation should fight for more fuel and funds, Jayewardene said.

“The government should declare wildlife conservation an essential service and provide the necessary resources, as some of the lost natural resources would be irreplaceable,” he says.

This article was first published on Mongabay.

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Projects Approved for Wildlife Conservation Council Grant Funds https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/projects-approved-for-wildlife-conservation-council-grant-funds/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/projects-approved-for-wildlife-conservation-council-grant-funds/ At its quarterly meeting on August 25, 2022, the Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved approximately $15.82 million in grants to help restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. Some of the 17 approved projects will benefit fish and wildlife – including some endangered species – while others will provide public access to important […]]]>

At its quarterly meeting on August 25, 2022, the Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) approved approximately $15.82 million in grants to help restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat throughout California. Some of the 17 approved projects will benefit fish and wildlife – including some endangered species – while others will provide public access to important natural resources. Several projects will also demonstrate the importance of protecting working landscapes that incorporate economic, social and environmental stewardship practices that benefit the environment, landowners and the local community.

Funding for these projects comes from a combination of sources, including the Habitat Conservation Fund and voter-approved bond measures to help preserve and protect California’s natural resources.

Funded projects include:

• A $1.59 million grant to the Great Basin Institute for a cooperative project with the National Park Service and Sequoia Park Conservancy to improve forest health and protect giant sequoia groves located in Sequoia Kings Canyon National Parks about 80 km east of Fresno in Tulare County.

• A $360,000 grant to the Land Conservancy of San Luis Obispo County to acquire a conservation easement on approximately 321 acres of land for the protection of important oak forests and wildlife resources, including the productivity of rangelands and open spaces to support functional landscapes while providing social, economic and environmental benefits, located near San Luis Obispo in San Luis Obispo County.

• A grant of $881,058 to the Resource Conservation District of Ventura County for a cooperative project with Ojai Valley Land Conservancy, Meiners Oaks Water District, City of Ojai, Senior Canyon Water District, Ventura River Water District, Merito Foundation, Watershed Progressive and Hicks Law to Expand plans more than 200 multiple-benefit projects to support flow improvement throughout the Ventura River watershed in Ventura County.

• An $863,500 grant to Los Angeles County for a project to build a new floating fishing pier at Puddingstone Reservoir, install trails and restrooms under the Americans with Disabilities Act, and installation of multilingual interpretive signs, located on land owned by the county in the town of San Dimas in Los Angeles County.

• A $1.29 million grant to Bear Yuba Land Trust to acquire a conservation easement on approximately 806 acres of land for the protection of water resources, wetlands, blue oak forests and lake habitat and prairies, located near the community of Penn Valley in Nevada County.

For more information about the WCB, visit wcb.ca.gov.

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RTL Today – Wildlife conservation: Ecuador investigates murder of four Galapagos giant tortoises https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/rtl-today-wildlife-conservation-ecuador-investigates-murder-of-four-galapagos-giant-tortoises/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 02:40:34 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/rtl-today-wildlife-conservation-ecuador-investigates-murder-of-four-galapagos-giant-tortoises/ Ecuadorian prosecutors announced on Monday an investigation into the alleged hunting and killing of four giant tortoises on the Galapagos Islands, a unique and fragile ecosystem considered a World Heritage Site. The prosecutor’s office said on Twitter that it was investigating “the alleged hunting and killing of four giant tortoises in the Galapagos National Park […]]]>

Ecuadorian prosecutors announced on Monday an investigation into the alleged hunting and killing of four giant tortoises on the Galapagos Islands, a unique and fragile ecosystem considered a World Heritage Site.

The prosecutor’s office said on Twitter that it was investigating “the alleged hunting and killing of four giant tortoises in the Galapagos National Park Wetlands Complex.”

A unit specializing in environmental crimes collects testimony from national park officials and appoints experts to carry out autopsies on the turtles.

The park management has filed a complaint for the death of the animals, the Ministry of the Environment said on its WhatsApp channel.

The ministry did not say what species the four turtles belonged to, but said they were hunted in the wetlands of Isabela Island, located 1,000 kilometers (600 miles) off the Ecuadorian coast in the Pacific Ocean.

Hunting wild animals is punishable by up to three years in prison in Ecuador.

In 2019, a man who rammed a turtle and damaged its shell was fined $11,000. That same year, another driver had to pay over $15,000 for running over and killing a native Galapagos iguana.

With an area of ​​over 4,500 square kilometers (1,800 sq mi), Isabela is the largest island in the archipelago and accounts for 60% of the land surface of the Remote Ocean Range.

The Galapagos Archipelago is designated as a Biosphere Reserve for its unique flora and fauna. It was once home to 15 species of turtles, three of which became extinct centuries ago, according to the Galapagos National Park.

In 2019, a tortoise of the species Chelonoidis phantastica was discovered on the island, more than a century after its supposed extinction.

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Conservationist Soksophea boosts wildlife conservation https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/conservationist-soksophea-boosts-wildlife-conservation/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 18:50:55 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/conservationist-soksophea-boosts-wildlife-conservation/ The town of Stung Sen in the province of Kampong Thom, located about 170 kilometers or a three-hour drive north of Phnom Penh, received a surprise visit from one of Cambodia’s favorite singers, Meas Soksophea, who is appeared to sing at an event to support the “Zero-Snare” campaign. This wasn’t your typical concert or show […]]]>

The town of Stung Sen in the province of Kampong Thom, located about 170 kilometers or a three-hour drive north of Phnom Penh, received a surprise visit from one of Cambodia’s favorite singers, Meas Soksophea, who is appeared to sing at an event to support the “Zero-Snare” campaign.

This wasn’t your typical concert or show when the karaoke actress nicknamed “Srey Aun” usually performs, but an environmental event in support of the campaign, which aims to eradicate entrapment, stop the trafficking of wild species and eliminate the demand for bushmeat and other wildlife products.

The launch in the city of Stung Sen was the fifth of the campaign – the other four are in the east of the country – and received a boost with the participation of nature and wildlife enthusiast Soksophea.

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She said she would do her best to use her popularity and influence to end the trapping crisis and fight wildlife trafficking in the country.

Sophea, who is an environmentalist, called on all her fans to play an important role and boycott ‘bushmeat’ while encouraging all restaurants and canteens to say ‘no’ to bushmeat on their menus.

“We can do it,” said the talented singer. “And the most important thing is to protect our forests and our wildlife.”

surprise visit

“I never thought my idol would come here,” a high school girl said at the Aug. 12 event. “But she came here with a deep love for the environment and wildlife.”

The star surprised her fans after appearing on camera in front of dozens of reporters at a press conference a day before the campaign was officially launched in the province on August 12.

Soksophea said his stay in Cambodia’s second-largest province was aimed at boosting wildlife conservation.

She included the event in her busy schedule of performances and songs to support the campaign and appear in front of cheering supporters with the message ‘Say No to Bushmeat’ and ‘Love the environment and natural resources’.

“I’m very happy to be here,” she said. “I am happy because the Ministry of the Environment understands my objective, and what I am trying to achieve are fruitful results by involving more young people in environmental protection, in particular by boycotting the meat of bush.”

After the event, Soksophea joined Ministry of Environment officials, rangers, students, government officials and other members of the public in a march through the city streets to call for an end to the trapping crisis.

“My fans now play a big role in making this work happen, and I’m proud of them,” she said.

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Soksorphea called on their fans to say “no” to bushmeat. Facebook

influential singer

At the campaign launch in the province, Soksophea, who wore a T-shirt with a picture of a trapped baby elephant on the back, also sang to an audience of hundreds who attended the event. The song named Domnos radius Where The solution raises awareness of environmental protection.

“The environment is life, nature is breath, and every tree is for the benefit of the earth, helping each other protect the forest,” the beautiful singer sang as the audience sang the chorus.

The event was posted on social media and attracted tens of thousands of viewers. His official Facebook page has 5.5 million followers.

“Please say ‘no to bushmeat!’ To destroy wild animals is to destroy yourself! Wildlife protection is our role,” said one of his recent Facebook posts, which received many positive responses from viewers.

The singer said she is committed to using social media as a platform to raise awareness about wildlife protection and conservation in the country.

“I will try to convince those who depend on trapping for a living to become people who love wildlife,” she said.

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Soksophea (C) joins the Ministry of Environment, wildlife activists, students and the public during the ‘Zero-Snare’ campaign in Kampong Thom province on August 12. Minister of the Environment

Environmental Protection Initiative

During an interview, Soksophea said that she will continue to produce attractive music videos to promote environmental protection.

“Some people say they’re not interested when we produce music videos related to the environment, but I won’t give up hope,” she said. “I want our people to love nature and wildlife.”

I will try to produce more music videos on related environmental issues,” she said. “If my project does not succeed, I will change technique.”

In 2010, Soksophea established a charitable organization known as “Meas Soksophea Heart Foundation”, which aims to raise awareness of issues affecting people in need from all sectors of society, including contributing to natural disasters, offering opportunities and education for young people and encouraging and educating young people on environmental issues.

“When I was on a singing mission abroad, I also accepted donations from generous people to help preserve elephants in Ratanakiri province,” she said.

“I will use a portion of these profits to help our society through environmental protection initiatives and wildlife conversation,” she added.

Soksophea said that during the Covid-19 pandemic, most campaigns had been suspended except for those using social media.

She also asked the Ministry of Environment and the competent authorities to authorize and facilitate her new campaigns after the improvement of the Covid-19 situation.

Neth Pheaktra, Secretary of State and spokesperson for the Ministry of Environment, expressed his strong support for the Soksophea initiative.

“We support its involvement in the protection and conservation of natural resources,” he said. “The Ministry of Environment alone could not make this mission a success, we have to work together.”

The passion for protection

In the interview, Sophea expressed her gratitude to all the restaurant and brewery owners who announced that they would stop offering bushmeat to customers.

So far, 47 eateries and eateries have removed bushmeat from their menus. These restaurants and breweries are located in the provinces of Kratie, Mondulkiri, Preah Vihear, Stung Treng and Kampong Thom, according to a ministry report.

The Zero-Snare campaign in the province was launched on August 12 by the Department of Environment, United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Fauna and Flora International (FFI), Conservation International (CI) , Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and the Regional Community Forestry Training Center (RECOFTC).

Soksophea urged villagers who depend on slash-and-burn agriculture and hunting activities to change this behavior, which will benefit nature and society.

“We have stopped some activities (bonding, hunting and poaching) in some areas,” she said. “Before, they thought that if they didn’t do it, they wouldn’t have anything (work) to do. For me, I will try my best to join with the government to encourage the villagers to give up illegal activities, but at the same time improve their livelihoods.

She said some NGO partners are already working with relevant ministries to improve local communities by providing financial and technical support, training and job creation, among many other activities.

Her involvement in environmental protection is nothing new for the popular Cambodian pop singer. In 2014, Soksophea advanced environmental protection by participating in a forest protection program with community members from Phnom Aural Wildlife Sanctuary in Kampong Speu Province and helped organize tree reforestation .

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GoMacro® Partnership Benefits Wildlife Conservation for Third Consecutive Year | New https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/gomacro-partnership-benefits-wildlife-conservation-for-third-consecutive-year-new/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 16:26:32 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/gomacro-partnership-benefits-wildlife-conservation-for-third-consecutive-year-new/ VIOLA, Wis.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–August 25, 2022– GoMacro®, known for its organic, plant-based nutrition bars, is delighted to partner with Sheldrick Wildlife Trust for the third consecutive year. Best known for its Project Orphans, the world’s first and most successful elephant orphan rescue and rehabilitation programme, the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust is a pioneering conservation organization dedicated to […]]]>

VIOLA, Wis.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–August 25, 2022–

GoMacro®, known for its organic, plant-based nutrition bars, is delighted to partner with Sheldrick Wildlife Trust for the third consecutive year. Best known for its Project Orphans, the world’s first and most successful elephant orphan rescue and rehabilitation programme, the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust is a pioneering conservation organization dedicated to protecting wildlife and habitats in Africa. from the east. Each year during the month of August, 10% of the net proceeds of GoMacro’s Smooth Sanctuary MacroBar are donated to the non-profit organization.

This press release is multimedia. View the full press release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220823005836/en/

The GoMacro® partnership benefits wildlife conservation for the third consecutive year. (Sheldrick Wildlife Trust)

“Our partnership with Sheldrick Wildlife Trust is another way we are putting our company principles of ‘treading light’ and ‘giving back’ into practice,” said Jola Sonkin, co-founder and CEO of GoMacro. “Their holistic approach to ensuring both animal protection and key habitat conservation is aligned with our mission to positively impact the planet.”

This year, GoMacro also adopted a two-year-old elephant named Vaarti, who was rescued by Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in Kenya’s Tsavo National Park after her mother was poached. Through the nonprofit, with financial support from GoMacro, the orphaned elephant receives the medical care, food and enrichment it needs to eventually return to a wild herd.

“Giving back is at the heart of our mission as a company, and we are thrilled to continue our partnership with an organization that is making an international impact,” says Sonkin.

In addition to the Smooth Sanctuary MacroBar, GoMacro is offering three other Give Back Bars®—Everlasting Joy, Protein Replenishment, and Sunny Uplift—to benefit nonprofits Feeding San Diego, Solutions for Change, Farm Sanctuary, and The Keep A Breast Foundation all throughout the year.

MacroBar Double Chocolate + Peanut Butter Chips is available for purchase at retailers nationwide, Amazon and gomacro.com.

About GoMacro

GoMacro® is the leading processor of healthy and delicious plant-based protein and nutrition bars. Mother-daughter owned and based in a small rural community, their goal is to inspire others to have healthy bodies, sharp minds, and bold spirits with products that positively impact the world. All GoMacro MacroBars® are sustainably sourced and certified organic, vegan, gluten-free, kosher, non-GMO, clean, and soy-free. Follow @gomacro on social media and learn more at www.gomacro.com.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220823005836/en/

marketing@gomacro.com

KEYWORD: WISCONSIN AFRICA UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: RETAIL SUSTAINABILITY ORGANIC FOOD WOMEN PHILANTHROPY ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH MEN FITNESS & NUTRITION FUNDRAISING SPECIALTY SUPERMARKET LIFESTYLE FOOD/BEVERAGE CONSUMER HEALTH

SOURCE: GoMacro

Copyright BusinessWire 2022.

PUBLISHED: 08/25/2022 12:26 PM / DISK: 08/25/2022 12:26 PM

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220823005836/en

Copyright BusinessWire 2022.

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GoMacro® Partnership Benefits Wildlife Conservation for Third Consecutive Year https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/gomacro-partnership-benefits-wildlife-conservation-for-third-consecutive-year/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/gomacro-partnership-benefits-wildlife-conservation-for-third-consecutive-year/ VIOLA, Wis.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–GoMacro®, known for its organic, plant-based nutrition bars, is thrilled to partner with Sheldrick Wildlife Trust for the third consecutive year. Best known for its Project Orphans, the world’s first and most successful elephant orphan rescue and rehabilitation programme, the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust is a pioneering conservation organization dedicated to protecting wildlife and […]]]>

VIOLA, Wis.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–GoMacro®, known for its organic, plant-based nutrition bars, is thrilled to partner with Sheldrick Wildlife Trust for the third consecutive year. Best known for its Project Orphans, the world’s first and most successful elephant orphan rescue and rehabilitation programme, the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust is a pioneering conservation organization dedicated to protecting wildlife and habitats in Africa. from the east. Each year during the month of August, 10% of the net proceeds of GoMacro’s Smooth Sanctuary MacroBar are donated to the non-profit organization.

“Our partnership with Sheldrick Wildlife Trust is another way we are putting our company principles of ‘treading light’ and ‘giving back’ into practice,” said Jola Sonkin, co-founder and CEO of GoMacro. “Their holistic approach to ensuring both animal protection and key habitat conservation is aligned with our mission to positively impact the planet.”

This year, GoMacro also adopted a two-year-old elephant named Vaarti, who was rescued by Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in Kenya’s Tsavo National Park after her mother was poached. Through the nonprofit, with financial support from GoMacro, the orphaned elephant receives the medical care, food and enrichment it needs to eventually return to a wild herd.

“Giving back is at the heart of our mission as a company, and we are thrilled to continue our partnership with an organization that is making an international impact,” says Sonkin.

In addition to the Smooth Sanctuary MacroBar, GoMacro is offering three other Give Back Bars®—Everlasting Joy, Protein Replenishment, and Sunny Uplift—to benefit nonprofits Feeding San Diego, Solutions for Change, Farm Sanctuary, and The Keep A Breast Foundation all throughout the year.

MacroBar Double Chocolate + Peanut Butter Chips is available for purchase at retailers nationwide, Amazon and gomacro.com.

About GoMacro

GoMacro® is the leading processor of healthy and delicious plant-based protein and nutrition bars. Mother-daughter owned and based in a small rural community, their goal is to inspire others to have healthy bodies, sharp minds, and bold spirits with products that positively impact the world. All GoMacro MacroBars® are sustainably sourced and certified organic, vegan, gluten-free, kosher, non-GMO, clean, and soy-free. Follow @gomacro on social media and learn more at www.gomacro.com.

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A wildlife conservation project is a tourism success story for Cahir https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/a-wildlife-conservation-project-is-a-tourism-success-story-for-cahir/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/a-wildlife-conservation-project-is-a-tourism-success-story-for-cahir/ Cahir is no stranger to celebrities and regularly hosts celebrities at its iconic castle, but some locals top the list when it comes to tourist affections. A particularly pampered range of poultry have taken up residence in Ireland’s largest and best-preserved medieval castle, winning the affection of locals and visitors alike. Councilor Andy Maloney, a […]]]>

Cahir is no stranger to celebrities and regularly hosts celebrities at its iconic castle, but some locals top the list when it comes to tourist affections.

A particularly pampered range of poultry have taken up residence in Ireland’s largest and best-preserved medieval castle, winning the affection of locals and visitors alike.

Councilor Andy Maloney, a herd champion as one of their daily feeders, believes their star power is a huge asset to the town.

“As soon as the tour buses arrive the drivers know they are there to let people know, so as soon as the gates open they head straight for the river to see the geese and ducks. They are a huge attraction.

Crowd delights have been brought to the town through an initiative by Cahir Tidy Towns, Cahir Anglers and Cahir Gun Club with the aim of reintroducing more wildlife to the River Suir and the town of Cahir.

A brood of mallards were the first to be introduced into a pen in Inch’s field and were soon joined by a flock of geese.

There are currently 37 birds residing near the castle, with a group of dedicated feeders tending to their diet of rolled barley, pellets and flour.

While the public tends to feed the birds bread, they are encouraged to switch to the healthier option of boiled oats.

Geese are a common domestic barnyard goose, derived from a swan goose and a grey-legged Icelandic breed that gives them their unique gray hue.

The domesticated group has become extremely familiar with the city. If there is a delay in feeding times, a herd has been known to head up Castle Street in search of breakfast.

Tidy Towns member John Cummins is one of the herd’s daily feeders and believes the conservation project has not only been successful, but has added a new asset to the town’s tourist circuit.

“They are a big attraction for the city. I often see that when I feed them, there are people taking pictures of them in the early morning and early evening. I could be 100 yards away and once I start whistling they start gagging.

Cllr Moloney drives his van through the parking lot every morning and some members of the group have become a little too familiar with the vehicle, with one choosing to jump in the back of the van to access the lunch bag, and another in taking advantage of an open door and was spotted behind the wheel.

Poultry maintains a largely positive relationship with the curious public always amazed by its tame and friendly personalities.

Like all stars though, they can have their moments.

“They can spit, it’s not bad sometimes, it’s just them protecting each other,” Andy said.

“What people don’t understand is that they could come and see them, but they could have a dog on a leash.
“They don’t realize that ducks fear dogs.”

Once a dog decided to take a goose, only to be chased by the bird who stood his ground.

The people of Cahir all tend to the herd, with bouncers in town known to keep an eye on them at night.

Ducks and geese also tolerate the canoes they encounter on the dam.

The herd has made headlines a few times, such as when Bruce the Goose was the victim of an unfortunate hit-and-run.
Other notable absences include some of the Icelandic grey-legged geese that have migrated along the Suir, with some ex-members now being spotted in Ballybrado and beyond.

In recent years the herd has grown in number due to the good care it receives from a number of dedicated feeders and fans.

“We’ve relocated some of them, but we’re not interested in relocating too many because there are some good characters in there,” Andy said.

The conservation project has been a resounding success, with mallard numbers increasing across Tipperary as a result of the initiative.

Not only did wildlife explode around the Suir as a result of their introduction, but the birds also brought unusual benefits.

Running near the castle, the Doctor’s River had nearly closed before the birds were introduced.

Ducks and geese have now reopened the river by clearing vegetation and scooping up large deposits of silt, saving locals the daunting task of clearing the way with shovels.

Along with the conservation project, the popular Inch Field has also been developed with new walkways and paths installed.

As staunch members of the locality, the ducks and geese needed to be consulted before the castle planted pollinator-friendly borders.

“A bag of seeds of each potential flower was left next to the geese and whatever they ate was left unsown.

“The result is that we planted pollinator-friendly lavender, red robins and Australian grass shrubs,” Andy explained.

The herd has become a particular hit on social media, with many tourists quacking to take in their photogenic presence in the sun on the parking lot tarmac or sitting along the weir.

“The number of strangers who get off the buses and want to take their picture, or if I feed them and they see them eating out of my hand, they ask for a piece of food so they can take a picture of them eating feed the geese,” Andy said.

“They are a huge tourist attraction. Everyone wants to come to Cahir to feed the geese. They interact with you and due to their nature they are accessible. »

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