Wildlife conservation – Rio Grande Delta Audubon http://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/ Wed, 18 May 2022 19:36:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-50x50.png Wildlife conservation – Rio Grande Delta Audubon http://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/ 32 32 CSIR-CCMB organizes a workshop on reproductive technologies in wildlife conservation at CSIR-IIIM https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/csir-ccmb-organizes-a-workshop-on-reproductive-technologies-in-wildlife-conservation-at-csir-iiim/ Wed, 18 May 2022 19:36:52 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/csir-ccmb-organizes-a-workshop-on-reproductive-technologies-in-wildlife-conservation-at-csir-iiim/ CSIR-CCMB organizes a workshop on reproductive technologies in wildlife conservation at CSIR-IIIM posted on May 19, 2022 | Author RK News Srinagar, May 18: A three-day workshop on reproductive technologies in wildlife conservation was organized on Wednesday by the CSIR-Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB)-Laboratory for the Conservation of Endangered Species […]]]>


CSIR-CCMB organizes a workshop on reproductive technologies in wildlife conservation at CSIR-IIIM


posted on May 19, 2022 | Author RK News



Srinagar, May 18: A three-day workshop on reproductive technologies in wildlife conservation was organized on Wednesday by the CSIR-Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB)-Laboratory for the Conservation of Endangered Species (LaCONES), Hyderabad in CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine (IIIM), Srinagar.

This is the first in a series of workshops planned to train J&K professionals to participate in and successfully implement conservation programs in the Union territory.

At the start of the event, Dr. Karthikeyan, Chief Scientist, CSIR-CCMB delivered the welcome speech and gave an overview of the workshop and informed that the workshop will focus on aspects of conservation breeding, reproductive physiology, wildlife endocrinology, bio-banking and assisted reproductive technologies. Speaking at the inaugural ceremony, Mr. Rashid Naqash, Regional Wildlife Warden J&K, who was the guest of honor at the event, said that the workshop and the initiative taken by CSIR-CCMB is commendable and timely, as the region faces various challenges in the conservation of endangered species. Recent technological advances in “assisted reproduction” have the potential to be used to propagate endangered species, he said. Dr. S. Madhusudan Rao, CEO of Atal CCMB Incubation Center (AIC-CCMB) who presided as guest of honour, highlighted in his address the need and importance of advanced conservation technologies for wildlife conservation and highlighted the relevance of the workshop to address challenges through training and capacity building of wildlife stakeholders and professionals. Through the collaborative efforts of the University of Kashmir, an exclusive laboratory for conservation is expected to be set up at CSIR-CCMB and the Development Research Center (CORD) of the University of Kashmir, he said. declared. He acknowledged the generous support received from IKP Knowledge Park Foundation, Hyderabad and Rural Electrification Corporation (REC) for this important initiative.

Dr. G. Umapathy, Senior Principal Scientist and Workshop Organizer, informed attendees that LaCONES is one of its kind labs, focused on supporting, helping and mentoring for the conservation of endangered species in the world. country and that the workshop, besides the technical deliberations, have 50% of practical training. The three-day program will consist of 10 lectures and 4 hands-on training sessions involving experts from SKUAST, Department of Kashmir and Livestock, Srinagar. Later, Dr. Fayaz Malik, Senior Principal Scientist, CSIR-IIIM, presented the vote of thanks to the experts, delegates, workshop organizers and informed that the participants would benefit from the initiative. The organizers expressed their gratitude to Dr. D. Srinivasa Reddy, Director, CSIR-IIIM, Jammu for his sponsorship and support for the smooth running of the workshop.

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Green Mountain Energy Sun Club Funds Sustainable Improvements for Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/green-mountain-energy-sun-club-funds-sustainable-improvements-for-wildlife-conservation-societys-bronx-zoo/ Tue, 17 May 2022 16:35:13 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/green-mountain-energy-sun-club-funds-sustainable-improvements-for-wildlife-conservation-societys-bronx-zoo/ Posted 05/17/22 Proposed by Green mountain energy The Bronx Zoo’s new electric vehicles are parked right in front of the zoo’s central building. Photo courtesy of Julie Larsen Maher. NEW YORK, May 17, 2022 /CSRwire/ — Bronx Zoo staff are embracing clean transportation in the park with 12 new electric utility vehicles, thanks to a […]]]>

Posted 05/17/22

Proposed by Green mountain energy

The Bronx Zoo’s new electric vehicles are parked right in front of the zoo’s central building. Photo courtesy of Julie Larsen Maher.

NEW YORK, May 17, 2022 /CSRwire/ — Bronx Zoo staff are embracing clean transportation in the park with 12 new electric utility vehicles, thanks to a $144,088 donation from the Green Mountain Energy Sun Club. This sustainable update to the Bronx Zoo’s fleet of carts will replace gas-powered vehicles used to transport small animals, materials and staff.

The Bronx Zoo, operated by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), is the nation’s largest urban zoo and welcomes approximately 2 million visitors each year. The zoo’s educational programs also reach more than 150,000 schoolchildren each year.

Founded in 1895, WCS saves wildlife and wild places in New York and around the world through science, conservation action, education, and inspiring people to value nature. WCS is the world’s premier conservation organization, a trusted advisor to the world’s top decision makers and a global conservation authority.

Bronx Zoo director Jim Breheny sits in one of the new electric vehicles in front of two large gates.
Bronx Zoo Director Jim Breheny sits in one of the new electric vehicles in front of the Rainey Memorial Gates. Photo courtesy of Julie Larsen Maher.

“The Bronx Zoo and WCS’s other zoos and aquariums in New York are committed to our conservation mission and are making improvements to ensure sustainability and nature-positive operations,” said Jim Breheny, executive vice president of WCS and director of the Bronx Zoo. “We are grateful to the Green Mountain Energy Sun Club for their generosity and look forward to partnering with other initiatives in the future.”

Since 2002, Green Mountain Energy Sun Club has empowered local communities by donating nearly $11.7 million to 143 nonprofit organizations across Texas and the Northeast. Green Mountain Energy invites its customers and employees to contribute and support more projects that promote renewable energy, energy efficiency, resource conservation and environmental stewardship. This one-of-a-kind model intrinsically ties community engagement to Green Mountain employees and customers.

“The Sun Club aims to raise awareness of the importance and benefits of sustainable practices, including the use of electric vehicles,” said Mark Parsons, Vice President of Green Mountain Energy. “This project allows us to work with the Wildlife Conservation Society to integrate eco-friendly, accessible and practical elements into the daily life of its community.

The Bronx Zoo is a leader in conservation and environmental education. At 14and Annual WCS Run for the Wild at the Bronx Zoo, some of the new vehicles donated by the Green Mountain Energy Sun Club were displayed at Astor Court as event attendees ran and walked.

About the Bronx Zoo

The Bronx Zoo, located on 265 acres of hardwood forest in the Bronx, NY, opened on November 8, 1899. It is world renowned for its leadership in animal welfare, breeding, veterinary care, education, science and conservation. The zoo is accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and is the flagship park of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) which operates the world’s largest network of urban wildlife parks, including the Bronx Zoo, Central Zoo Park, Prospect Park Zoo, Queens Zoo and New York Aquarium. Our curators and animal care staff work to save, propagate and maintain populations of threatened and endangered species. We have educated and inspired over 400 million visitors to our zoos and aquariums since we opened and welcome approximately 4 million visitors to our parks each year, including approximately half a million students each year. The Bronx Zoo is the Bronx Borough’s largest employer of young people, providing opportunities and helping to transform lives in one of the nation’s most underserved communities. The Bronx Zoo is the subject of THE ZOO, a documentary series streaming worldwide on Animal Planet. Members of the media should contact mpulsinelli@wcs.org (718-220-5182).

About the Sun Club

Green Mountain Energy is changing the way electricity is generated and advancing sustainable communities through the work of the Green Mountain Energy Sun Club. Since its creation in 2002, Sun Club® has donated more than $11 million to 143 nonprofit organizations across Texas and the Northeast. Sun Club works with non-profit organizations on projects focused on renewable energy, energy efficiency, resource conservation and environmental stewardship. To learn more about Green Mountain Energy and Sun Club or to apply for a Sun Club grant, visit greenmountain.com/sunclub.

Media:
Green mountain energy
media@greenmountain.com
713-537-5735

###

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Green mountain energy

Green mountain energy

Green Mountain Energy Company was founded in 1997 with a mission to change the way energy is produced. Today, we remain 100% committed to that mission, which makes us the nation’s oldest renewable energy retailer and a pioneer in clean energy. We provide our customers with electrical products made from renewable resources like wind and solar and carbon offsets that help neutralize carbon emissions.

We live our commitment to sustainability inside and out: every product our company offers has an environmental benefit, and our business operates with a zero carbon footprint – accolades that make us proud!

More than Green mountain energy

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Dan Geddings: The History of Wildlife Conservation https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/dan-geddings-the-history-of-wildlife-conservation/ Sat, 14 May 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/dan-geddings-the-history-of-wildlife-conservation/ BY DAN GEDDINGSOpen-air columnist Hunters and anglers paved the way for wildlife conservation. Outdoor enthusiasts have spent time and money managing America’s natural resources. Our dollars and our habitat work have made a difference in natural ecosystems. Game and landscapes have benefited from our efforts, and other non-game wildlife has also thrived as a result. […]]]>

BY DAN GEDDINGS
Open-air columnist

Hunters and anglers paved the way for wildlife conservation. Outdoor enthusiasts have spent time and money managing America’s natural resources. Our dollars and our habitat work have made a difference in natural ecosystems. Game and landscapes have benefited from our efforts, and other non-game wildlife has also thrived as a result.

From the beginning, President Theodore Roosevelt, who was an avid hunter, led the charge to create wildlife programs, preserve lands, and establish national parks. Roosevelt wrote about his hunting adventures and his personal conservation ethic.

Aldo Leopold, the author of “A Sand County Almanac”, detailed wildlife management philosophies in his writings and described a “land ethic” that changed attitudes towards our natural resources and launched a national conservation movement.

In 1937, the Pittman-Robertson Act was established. He imposed a federal excise tax on ammunition and sporting firearms. The law provides funds to each state to manage wildlife and their habitats. The law has been amended several times and has generated over $12 billion for conservation. The Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp, also known as the “duck stamp,” has generated more than $800 million for the purchase and lease of wetland habitat since 1934. Duck hunters are required to have a valid stamp in their possession, but anyone can purchase the stamp.

The Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration Act was passed in 1950. Commonly known as the Dingell-Johnson Act, it provides financial assistance for state fish restoration and management plans and projects.



These programs were not imposed on outdoor enthusiasts, but championed by them. Hunters and anglers have worked hard to get these laws passed for the good of the resource. Non-hunters have also benefited from the programs by engaging in hobbies such as bird watching, nature photography, hiking and other outdoor activities. State wildlife management programs and law enforcement efforts are funded by license sales and taxes.

In South Carolina, wild turkeys have been trapped in the Lowcountry and moved to suitable habitats across the state. This is a tremendous conservation success story. White-tailed deer have been restocked upstate and are now our first big game. Our Department of Natural Resources, funded primarily by sportsman money, has done a tremendous job for all of our state’s wildlife.

Private non-profit organizations such as Ducks Unlimited, Quality Deer Management Association, and the National Wild Turkey Federation have raised millions of dollars from sportsmen for wildlife management activities, conservation programs, and hunting advocacy. . Dollars donated by members of these groups fund conservation work in their own neighborhoods and across North America.

Hunting clubs, supported by their members, manage properties for the benefit of wildlife and fishing. Food plots, prescribed burns and timber management activities are carried out to improve wildlife habitat on private lands, sometimes at great expense to the landowner. Pond owners establish brush piles, fertilize and lime the water, and manage fish populations.

We pay the bills and try to give back more than we take.

Email Dan Geddings at cdgeddings@gmail.com.

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URI Wildlife, graduate in conservation biology ready to take off his career – URI News https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/uri-wildlife-graduate-in-conservation-biology-ready-to-take-off-his-career-uri-news/ Mon, 09 May 2022 14:18:05 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/uri-wildlife-graduate-in-conservation-biology-ready-to-take-off-his-career-uri-news/ KINGSTON, RI – 9 May 2022 – It is well before dawn in Point Judith. The salty mist mixes with a cold autumn wind that seems to sneak around the neck. It is too early for walkers along the shore. But a lone figure stands perched atop a two-story concrete bunker, a remnant of World […]]]>

KINGSTON, RI – 9 May 2022 – It is well before dawn in Point Judith. The salty mist mixes with a cold autumn wind that seems to sneak around the neck. It is too early for walkers along the shore. But a lone figure stands perched atop a two-story concrete bunker, a remnant of World War II. He points a microphone at the sky.

Instead of searching for enemy fighter jets, Sam Miller tracks bird migration as part of his bachelor’s degree in wildlife and conservation biology at the University’s College of Environment and Life Sciences. of Rhode Island.

Miller’s interest in wildlife dates back to his pre-teens, when he would borrow his mother’s camera to take pictures of any wildlife he could find. “And then it shifted to taking pictures of birds at our feeders,” Miller said. “It started with wondering what species these birds were and putting a name to the picture. I opened up my first field guide and started flipping through the pages and seeing all the different birds I I didn’t know they existed. From then on, I just started going out and looking for them.

Miller initially considered a major in biology, but the lure of the outdoors was strong. “I’ve always been interested in the natural world, and wildlife conservation seemed like the most appropriate major,” said Miller, a May graduate of URI. “I wanted to focus on being more outside of contact with animals, rather than the practicalities of studying cell life and its more medical aspect.”

Native Gambrills, Maryland, Miller came to URI as part of his academic research and fell in love with the area. “I saw they were doing some really cool research here. I enjoy studying and observing bird migration in the northeast. It’s one of the best places to see fall migration, so I thought I’d get busy. And besides, I also liked the size of the school and the campus. It was a kind of good compromise between a small campus and very large ones.

One of the highlights of Miller’s time at college came in November when he discovered a sharp-tailed sandpiper, a bird that belongs to Siberia, while leading a birding event. at the Galilee Bird Sanctuary in Narragansett. He had recruited about 35 bird watchers and was looking around when a bird exploded in flight right in front of him.

“I was extremely shocked, and I think it was just as surprised as I was,” he said. “My heart skipped a beat for a second and then I realized this didn’t seem to match everything I had in my bird memory bank.”

Eventually, the sighting of rare birds was confirmed, and Miller realized that the sighting made an important contribution to the birding community. It was the first time a sharp-tailed sandpiper had been spotted in the Ocean State.

Such experiences were part of the reason Miller pursued his original choice of wildlife and conservation biology. “I loved all of the courses in my major because they really emphasized experiential learning outside of the classroom.”

This experiential learning was why Miller spent many hours standing atop a Point Judith bunker, pointing a microphone at the predawn sky. He listened to the calls of birds in order to collect data on their migration for a class.

“I was able to get a grant that gave me enough money for the microphone technology, but other than that I was on my own with the birds. It seemed appropriate for my entry-level research of having some high-tech mic, but mostly doing it with human labor,” he said.

“I’m still working on data analysis through a course recommended by URI Professor Peter Paton. So everything has a way of fitting together again.

In the coming months, Miller will be working with a bird biologist from Rhode Island’s Department of Environmental Management, which is an exciting prospect for him.

“I’ll be busy running in the salt marshes and doing aerial surveys of colonial waterfowl and salt marsh sparrows and more. I’m going to do all kinds of fun projects this summer,” Miller said. “My first day is before graduation, so I’ll start running.”

Hugh Markey wrote this press release.

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Portman has been a strong advocate for wildlife conservation https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/portman-has-been-a-strong-advocate-for-wildlife-conservation/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 02:22:51 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/portman-has-been-a-strong-advocate-for-wildlife-conservation/ For the past 30 years, the Cincinnati Zoo has presented its Wildlife Conservation Award to world-renowned field biologists and thought leaders in conservation. International luminaries such as Jane Goodall, Roger Tori Peterson, George Schaller and Nobel Laureate Wangari Mathai are past recipients of this award. This year, we are proud to present the 2022 Cincinnati […]]]>

For the past 30 years, the Cincinnati Zoo has presented its Wildlife Conservation Award to world-renowned field biologists and thought leaders in conservation. International luminaries such as Jane Goodall, Roger Tori Peterson, George Schaller and Nobel Laureate Wangari Mathai are past recipients of this award.

This year, we are proud to present the 2022 Cincinnati Zoo Wildlife Conservation Award to Senator Rob Portman, in honor of his more than 30-year career in Washington. During this time, Portman consistently pushed through important bipartisan legislation in favor of the forest, wild lands, national parks, and wildlife conservation.

As a young congressman in the 1990s, he drafted the now famous Rainforest Conservation Act, which has been called one of the most effective habitat protection laws ever passed. The support raised by this program, also known as “debt for nature”, uses common sense methods to good effect, having protected more than 69,000,000 acres of rainforest to date.

U.S. Senator Rob Portman surveys a site in need of repair along the Ohio and Erie Canal towpath during a visit to Cuyahoga Valley National Park on Wednesday.

In 2020, his bipartisan Restore the Parks Act was signed into law, providing $12 billion in funding for infrastructure improvements in our national parks. And in 2021, he introduced the Eliminate, Neutralize and Disrupt (END) Wildlife Trafficking Reauthorization and Enhancement Act to combat the illegal trade in wild plants and animals.

Key to Portman’s work effectiveness has long been his reach across the aisle to create bipartisan support for legislation that helps all Americans.

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Wildlife conservation can help stabilize the climate • Earth.com https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/wildlife-conservation-can-help-stabilize-the-climate-earth-com/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 18:44:13 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/wildlife-conservation-can-help-stabilize-the-climate-earth-com/ Biodiversity loss and climate change are the two most pressing environmental challenges facing humanity today. Although these two questions have been largely addressed separately, a new study published in the journal Biology of global change argues that many conservation actions that slow, stop, or reverse biodiversity loss could also benefit climate change. According to the […]]]>

Biodiversity loss and climate change are the two most pressing environmental challenges facing humanity today. Although these two questions have been largely addressed separately, a new study published in the journal Biology of global change argues that many conservation actions that slow, stop, or reverse biodiversity loss could also benefit climate change.

According to the first draft of the “Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework”, published by the Secretariat of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), there are 21 targets that should be implemented by 2030 in order to to reduce potential threats to biodiversity by implementing tools and solutions to protect the incredible wealth of life forms on our planet. Now experts have found that 14 of those goals could also slow climate change.

One of them, for example, is to create protected areas and connect existing ones via natural corridors.

“There is growing evidence that the creation of new protected areas and the proper management of existing ones on land and at sea help to mitigate climate change through carbon capture and storage,” said the co-author. of the study, Josef Settele, biodiversity expert. and preservation at Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research.

Previous studies have shown that terrestrial protected areas around the world store 12-16% of the total global carbon stock, while deep-sea ecosystems also act as important carbon sinks.

Other biodiversity targets that could help mitigate climate change also include: restoring degraded ecosystems (eg tropical or subtropical forests) or coastal habitats (eg coral reefs or seagrass beds); develop green and blue infrastructure in cities (eg parks, lakes or green roofs); treat waste in a more sustainable way, separating biodegradable products from recyclable products; reduce pollution from excess nutrients; or increase the sustainability of food production and supply chains.

However, there may also be conflicting objectives between protecting biodiversity and protecting the climate. For example, although mimicking traditional land use systems (rather than intensifying or even abandoning land use) has clear benefits for biodiversity conservation by maintaining a high diversity of pollinators, it can have a negative impact on the climate by reducing the extent of the world’s forests, which can sequester far more carbon than agricultural land.

In addition, cattle or sheep farming releases methane, which is harmful to the climate. Thus, slowing climate change while implementing adaptation measures without losing biodiversity is often only possible through trade-offs, Professor Settele pointed out.

“There is also the risk that nature will be discussed as a way to solve the climate problem; that’s quite problematic,” added study co-author Hans-Otto Pörtner, a climate researcher at the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research (AWI).

“The capacity of ecosystems to slow climate change is overestimated and climate change is undermining this capacity. Only when we succeed in drastically reducing emissions from fossil fuels can nature help us to stabilize the climate,” he concluded.

By Andrei Ionescu, Terre.com Personal editor

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Wildlife conservation camp deadline is approaching https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/wildlife-conservation-camp-deadline-is-approaching/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 15:44:59 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/wildlife-conservation-camp-deadline-is-approaching/ By Jessica DomelMultimedia journalist Teenagers in Texas who are interested in wildlife, the great outdoors and conservation only have days left to apply for this year’s Wildlife Conservation Camp hosted by the Texas Chapter of the Wildlife Society. “Wildlife Conservation Camp is a five-day summer camp focused on teaching students about nature, ecology and wildlife,” […]]]>

By Jessica Domel
Multimedia journalist

Teenagers in Texas who are interested in wildlife, the great outdoors and conservation only have days left to apply for this year’s Wildlife Conservation Camp hosted by the Texas Chapter of the Wildlife Society.

Wildlife Conservation Camp is a five-day summer camp focused on teaching students about nature, ecology and wildlife,” said Bobby Allcorn, camp director and wildlife biologist for the department. of Texas Parks and Wildlife. “It started in 1993 and is organized by the Texas Chapter of the Wildlife Society through volunteer members seeking to try and educate our high school students about wildlife.”

The camp will be held July 9-13 at Big Woods on the Trinity in the Tennessee Colony.

“We’re really focused on introducing students to the natural world around them,” Allcorn told Texas Farm Bureau Radio Network. “We do a lot of plant identification, try to find different wildlife species, and review wildlife trapping techniques.”

The camp also covers hunting as a management tool, the use of firearms, and gun safety.

“We go into fishing as a management tool, talk a bit about the different ways to do it, and get a bit of experience fishing,” Allcorn said.

The camp’s natural resources, conservation and wildlife specialists also discuss inventory techniques, prescribed burns and habitat management.

“We try to expose young people to many aspects of wildlife and wildlife conservation in Texas,” Allcorn said. “There are all kinds of different programs and different aspects that we will be happy to show campers.

The camp is for high school students, including seniors, who are interested in wildlife and habitat conservation and management or who wish to pursue a career in a wildlife or resource-related field. natural.

Students who have attended camp in the past are encouraged to apply to attend again.

“Each year we try to bring back a few of our campers from the previous year, if they are interested. They can learn a lot more and can also help new campers get to grips with what camp will be like,” Allcorn said.

The cost is $350 and includes accommodation and meals. Scholarships are available. Students can also apply for funds from community organizations or sponsors.

Students must be nominated by a member of the Texas Chapter of the Wildlife Society, teacher, county extension worker, youth worker, natural resources professional, or county agricultural office.

Details are available here at Wildlifecamptx.org.

The new motorhome app is available here.

Prospective campers must submit their documents by Sunday May 1st.

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Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation tells family to release pet coyote or put it down https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/oklahoma-department-of-wildlife-conservation-tells-family-to-release-pet-coyote-or-put-it-down/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 23:06:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/oklahoma-department-of-wildlife-conservation-tells-family-to-release-pet-coyote-or-put-it-down/ OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) — An Oklahoma family is frustrated and heartbroken after the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife told them they had two choices: return a coyote they’ve raised since he was a puppy in the wild or have him put down. “They might be predatory hunters, but she’s not a predator,” Morgan Hensley said. “It’s […]]]>

OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) — An Oklahoma family is frustrated and heartbroken after the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife told them they had two choices: return a coyote they’ve raised since he was a puppy in the wild or have him put down.

“They might be predatory hunters, but she’s not a predator,” Morgan Hensley said. “It’s about how you raise them and things like that.”

Hensley told KFOR that she forms a close bond with their coyote, Jersey, which she says is domesticated.

“[She] and I would sit on the stairs and share donut holes,” Hensley said.

For 10 months, Hensley’s father, Carl Sandifer, owner of the Rattlesnake and Venom Museum, raised Jersey and other wildlife.

jersey the coyote

“People came to see. They wanted to see her, especially since she had a connection with autistic children. It was really amazing how it happened,” said Carl Sandifer.

Under Carl’s wildlife breeder license, he can legally breed Jersey.

The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation told KFOR that it’s not Sandifer’s license that’s the problem, it’s where Jersey is from.

Officials told KFOR that it was obtained illegally.

“So a frequent visitor to the museum said, ‘Hey, I found this coyote. Would you guys like it? Said Sandifer.

The lack of a commercial breeding license for the visitor and the lack of proper Jersey documentation are two reasons the Department of Wildlife told KFOR Jersey he could not remain in the care of the family.

According to an email obtained by Hensely, wildlife officials have given the family a choice: release Jersey into the wild or she will be shot.

“I don’t believe in killing an animal just because it’s an animal. She’s not a threat. She is in no way dangerous,” Hensley said.

“I’m confused with the law,” Sandifer said. “But it says in there, you know, there’s an exception though, unless the wildlife department deems she might be here.”

KFOR questioned the Wildlife Department about this exception.

“I mean, they gave us an exception before,” Hensley said.

Col. Nathan Erdman of the Wildlife Department said KFOR coyotes are specifically excluded from a list of animals that can be domesticated, and that is the law.

According to Oklahoma statutes,

By domestic animal, we mean any animal kept for pleasure or for utility, which has become adapted to life in association with and use by human beings, and should not include animals normally found in the wildunless expressly designated by the Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission.

§800:25-25-2

The following wildlife species are exempt from import and export permits, commercial wildlife breeders permits, non-commercial wildlife breeders permits and commercial hunting area permit requirements:

  1. Alpacas, guanacos and vicunas
  2. Bison
  3. Camels
  4. Cats (except native cats and bears)
  5. Livestock
  6. Chickens
  7. Chinchillas.
  8. Dogs (except coyotes and native foxes)
  9. Exotic tropical fish
  10. Ferrets (except black-footed, Mustela nigripes)
  11. Gerbils
  12. Goats
  13. Guinea pigs
  14. Hamsters
  15. Hedgehogs
  16. Horse, donkeys and mules
  17. llamas
  18. Mice (except species normally found in the wild)
  19. Native invertebrates (except crayfish and all freshwater mussels, including zebra mussel and Asian clam)
  20. Peacock
  21. Pigeons
  22. Migratory waterfowl not listed as protected by Federal Regulation 50
  23. Pigs except javelins
  24. Rabbits (except cottontail rabbits, hares and swamp rabbits, and other such species normally found in nature)
  25. Rats (except species normally found in nature)
  26. Saltwater crustaceans and molluscs (import for human consumption)
  27. Sheep (except dall sheep and bighorn sheep, Ovis sp.)
  28. Turkeys (except Rio Grande, Eastern, Merriam and Osceola or any subspecies)
  29. Zebras
  30. gerboa
  31. sugar gliders
  32. civilians
  33. Wallaby
  34. Kangaroo
  35. Fennec fox
  36. Coatimundi
  37. Primates

“The coyotes are on the list as not being a pet. There is nothing to investigate, they have no documentation showing where the coyote came from from a legal source (which cannot be from nature), so they can’t keep it under their license,” Col. Erdman said in a statement. “These are the laws we discuss when answering your questions. This is not our opinion, we report just what the laws say on the matter. If you have any other questions that are not covered by the above laws, please let me know.”

“She’s not a giant grizzly bear. She’s not a mountain lion,” Sandifer said. “She’s not something like that that needs a big cage.”

Hensley told KFOR that Jersey had been taken to an animal sanctuary, but the Wildlife Department was not comfortable with the situation.

“We are trusted to take care of an alligator, but not a coyote. Why mammal versus reptile? said Hensley. “It’s legal to fly on a plane in Oklahoma and shoot a coyote, but it’s wrong to keep it in public and educate them.”

According to Hensley, the animal is now with a wildlife rehabilitator who has determined that she cannot be rehabilitated and released.

She told News 4 that the state was ordering her to be dropped off.

The facility has neither confirmed nor denied if this Jersey was there or if the animal was put down.

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Wildlife conservation efforts shift to NFT-funded initiatives https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/wildlife-conservation-efforts-shift-to-nft-funded-initiatives/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/wildlife-conservation-efforts-shift-to-nft-funded-initiatives/ Non-Fungible Twin Digital Tokens, or NFTs, are no longer restricted to consumer products. Netherlands-based decentralized carbon credit exchange Coorest and southern hemisphere conservation consultancy PLCnetwork have teamed up to tokenize real-world endangered animals in game reserves and conservation areas private in Africa. These wildlife NFTs allow bearers to sponsor an elephant, lion, cheetah or rhinoceros. […]]]>

Non-Fungible Twin Digital Tokens, or NFTs, are no longer restricted to consumer products. Netherlands-based decentralized carbon credit exchange Coorest and southern hemisphere conservation consultancy PLCnetwork have teamed up to tokenize real-world endangered animals in game reserves and conservation areas private in Africa. These wildlife NFTs allow bearers to sponsor an elephant, lion, cheetah or rhinoceros. Proceeds from sales will go towards the food, shelter and safety of the animals they represent.

Cointelegraph spoke with William ten Zijthoff, Founder and Managing Director of Coorest, to learn more about combining blockchain and sustainability with wildlife preservation. Coorest is best known for operating a CO2 clearing system NFTrees which tokenizes assets or yield bonds and carbon credits which are tradable on the blockchain. Those who purchase an NFTree collect and burn the CO2 tokens to record the amount of CO2 reduced.

Similarly, the concept of wildlife treats conservation as an asset to be invested in for the benefit of animals and the environment. He explained that conservation areas or ecolodges “need new business models that do not depend on tourism for their income or donations”. That’s why Coorest has partnered with the Southern Hemisphere PLC network with connections to wildlife reserves in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Botswana.

According to PLCnetwork founder Dr Julia Baum, the main problem with conserving wildlife in the field is that “it is expensive and resources are often very limited”. Even for a private reserve with a generally larger budget, the cost of caring for an African bush elephant, for example, can be very expensive as it includes fencing, surveillance, 24 hour anti-poaching patrols/ 24 and veterinary assistance.

When asked about the main benefits of owning an elephaNFT or a lioNFT, ten Zijthoff said it was about building a long-term relationship with the animals, the wildlife sanctuary and Coorest. He also clarified that possession of wildlife NFTs does not give ownership of the animals, but rather provides monthly “proof of life” verification that the animal is still alive. The metadata for each NFT contains species, age, and sex information specific to each tokenized animal. Holders will also be invited to visit the wildlife reserve and meet the animals.

70% of the funds from these wildlife NFTs will go to the game reserve or conservation area, with funds being released on a monthly or set schedule. VulcanForged is a blockchain game studio and NFT marketplace that has partnered with Coorest to sell and showcase its wildlife NFTs in various gambling games to earn, providing holders with additional in-game uses and rewards.

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While this first wildlife NFT pilot project is underway to “further develop global innovation in conservation,” Baum believes these new types of NFT impacts can educate a new and broader audience about actions. conservation and social development. The long-term goal is to achieve greater investment and success on the ground across the world, she added.