Wildlife sanctuary – Rio Grande Delta Audubon http://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 10:37:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-50x50.png Wildlife sanctuary – Rio Grande Delta Audubon http://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/ 32 32 Uttar Pradesh: tiger carcass found floating in channel at Katarniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary in Bahraich https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/uttar-pradesh-tiger-carcass-found-floating-in-channel-at-katarniaghat-wildlife-sanctuary-in-bahraich/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/uttar-pradesh-tiger-carcass-found-floating-in-channel-at-katarniaghat-wildlife-sanctuary-in-bahraich/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 05:30:20 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/uttar-pradesh-tiger-carcass-found-floating-in-channel-at-katarniaghat-wildlife-sanctuary-in-bahraich/ Bahraich, October 10: The carcass of a male tiger was found floating in a canal at Katarniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary in Bahraich. No evidence of external injury was found on the tiger’s carcass, official sources said. The tiger carcass, which floated on Saturday under the Chaudhary Charan Singh (Girijapuri) dam built on a canal connected to […]]]>

Bahraich, October 10: The carcass of a male tiger was found floating in a canal at Katarniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary in Bahraich. No evidence of external injury was found on the tiger’s carcass, official sources said.

The tiger carcass, which floated on Saturday under the Chaudhary Charan Singh (Girijapuri) dam built on a canal connected to the Ghaghra River in Uttar Pradesh. Divisional Forestry Officer (DFO) Akashdeep Badhawan, said he was spotted by villagers around 3:30 p.m.

Residents immediately informed the forestry and irrigation services. A forest service team was dispatched to bring the carcass to the Katarniaghat forest estate office, he said. Male Royal Bengal tiger carcass found in the Karuabari region of Kaziranga National Park.

At first glance, the tiger was about four years old and there was no sign of an external wound on the carcass. A group of vets will perform an autopsy to determine the cause of death, he added.

Ramesh Kumar Pandey, senior Indian Forest Service officer, an expert on tiger conservation, said according to National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) standard operating procedure, every tiger death is considered unnatural, unless proven otherwise.

To prove that a tiger’s death is natural, you have to rule out all other angles like poaching and poisoning, he explained. It is very rare for a tiger to be found dead in the water because big cats are good swimmers, he explained.

(The above story first appeared on LatestLY on October 10, 2021 at 11:00 am IST. For more information and updates on Politics, World, Sports, Entertainment, and Lifestyle , connect to our website Latestly.com).


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Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary receives $ 150,000 from Oneida Nation https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/bay-beach-wildlife-sanctuary-receives-150000-from-oneida-nation/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/bay-beach-wildlife-sanctuary-receives-150000-from-oneida-nation/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 23:58:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/bay-beach-wildlife-sanctuary-receives-150000-from-oneida-nation/ GREEN BAY, WB (WBAY) – The Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary in Green Bay received a donation of $ 150,000 from the Oneida Nation on Tuesday. The donation is part of the government-to-government cooperation agreement that the Oneida Nation signed with the city of Green Bay earlier this year. The sanctuary superintendent says donations like this […]]]>

GREEN BAY, WB (WBAY) – The Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary in Green Bay received a donation of $ 150,000 from the Oneida Nation on Tuesday.

The donation is part of the government-to-government cooperation agreement that the Oneida Nation signed with the city of Green Bay earlier this year.

The sanctuary superintendent says donations like this help the sanctuary continue to care for the animals and educate the public for free.

We are a free community park open daily. Donations like this are therefore extremely important. These are going to support our wildlife rehabilitation program and things like that. And all these animals that are here have come down to us without being able to be released into the wild. So it’s a good place, a permanent home for them, but it also allows students and the community to get closer to these animals. A whole new appreciation and kind of encouragement for the next generation of environmentalists.>

“We are a free community park open every day, so donations like this are extremely important. These are to support our wildlife rehabilitation program and things like that, and all of these animals that are here have come down to us without being able to be released into the wild. So it’s a good place, a permanent home for them, but it also allows the students and the community to get closer to these animals, a whole new appreciation and kind of encouragement for the next generation of environmentalists ”, said Superintendent Steve Lakatos.

Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary is currently celebrating 85 years of helping injured animals.

Copyright 2021 WBA. All rights reserved.


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Local clubs clean up wildlife sanctuary – The Suburban Times https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/local-clubs-clean-up-wildlife-sanctuary-the-suburban-times-2/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/local-clubs-clean-up-wildlife-sanctuary-the-suburban-times-2/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 23:08:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/local-clubs-clean-up-wildlife-sanctuary-the-suburban-times-2/ News from the Town of Lakewood. LAKEWOOD, Washington – Over the weekend, Rotarians, Kiwanians, Lions, students and local residents rallied to clean up the South Puget Sound Wildlife Preserve. Volunteers helped by covering the graffiti, removing the Scotch Broom and installing benches. A resident of Lakewood donated two benches in her father’s name – he […]]]>

News from the Town of Lakewood.

LAKEWOOD, Washington – Over the weekend, Rotarians, Kiwanians, Lions, students and local residents rallied to clean up the South Puget Sound Wildlife Preserve. Volunteers helped by covering the graffiti, removing the Scotch Broom and installing benches.

A resident of Lakewood donated two benches in her father’s name – he regularly walked the park with his dogs for over 20 years. Members of the Steilacoom High School Key Club have removed the Scotch Broom, ridding an entire hill of the invasive plant. Local Rotarians and Kiwanians covered graffiti and picked up trash. Ron Banner, superintendent of the Clover Park school district, cut down dead branches overhanging the walking trails.

Susanna Keilman


The South Puget Sound Wildlife Area is owned by the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife. Alan Billingsley, a member of Clover Park Rotary, said the state had lost funds to preserve the area, so the club took the initiative to restore it.

We have groups here from two different clubs (Lakewood and Clover Park Rotary Clubs), we have Kiwanis here today, we have Lions here, we have the Interlaaken Gardening Club, we have students from Pierce College, students from Steilacoom High The school, and a whole bunch of people in general from the community.

They came to covet and care for this neighborhood, recognizing that it is one of Lakewood’s gems in the middle of our town.

Alan Billingsley, Clover Park Rotary Club Member

The establishment has a long history. It was donated to the state by the Andrew Byrd family. The family were among the first settlers in the area. Clover Park Rotary now visits the area twice a year to help restore it. The club envisions a place where the community can walk and enjoy nature, and a place where students can see and study wildlife, including several endangered species.

Lakewood Truck and Tractor Day

Always generous with their time and labor, local service clubs picked up trash, grew produce for food banks, beautified public spaces, and contributed countless other ways to the community in the past year alone. Local service clubs are consistently proactive and committed to improving Lakewood.

The South Puget Sound Wildlife Area is a state-owned facility and is home to a variety of plants and wildlife. The facility is open to the public during the day – it’s a beautiful place to walk and observe nature.


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Oneida Nation donates $ 150,000 for Green Bay Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/oneida-nation-donates-150000-for-green-bay-bay-beach-wildlife-sanctuary/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/oneida-nation-donates-150000-for-green-bay-bay-beach-wildlife-sanctuary/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 17:39:32 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/oneida-nation-donates-150000-for-green-bay-bay-beach-wildlife-sanctuary/ GREEN BAY – Oneida Nation President Tehassi Hill on Tuesday presented a donation of $ 150,000 to the Green Bay Bay Beach Wildlife Preserve. “It’s one of those responsible educational resources in our community that’s always free,” Hill said in a statement. “It only takes a little time and travel to enjoy the local wildlife […]]]>

GREEN BAY – Oneida Nation President Tehassi Hill on Tuesday presented a donation of $ 150,000 to the Green Bay Bay Beach Wildlife Preserve.

“It’s one of those responsible educational resources in our community that’s always free,” Hill said in a statement. “It only takes a little time and travel to enjoy the local wildlife in its natural habitat. During the COVID-19 pandemic, this remains a great place to spend family time outdoors in a safe environment. “

The wildlife preserve spans 600 acres on the northeast side of town and includes trails, a nature center, habitats for wolves, coyotes, deer and bald eagles, and ponds for waterfowl.

A juvenile cedar waxwing is one of the young animals that were brought to the Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary in Green Bay for rehabilitation.

It was incorporated in 1936 and serves as a place where staff and volunteers help animals in distress recover.

The donation was part of a larger agreement reached earlier this year between the Oneida Nation and the city that recognizes tribal sovereignty and cooperation between tribal police and municipal police. The agreement also provides for an agreement to pay the tribe to the city for public works services.

Part of the west side of Green Bay is located on the Oneida Reserve.

This year’s deal ended a 2016 deal in which the Oneida Nation contributed $ 40,000 per year to the Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary.

Canada geese alight for a landing at the Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary on the east side of Green Bay.

Hill said the operators of the shrine were dependent on this funding, so the Oneida Nation agreed to make a one-time payment of $ 150,000 to the shrine under the new agreement in a “good faith gesture.”

He said, “The Oneida people have always had a respect for nature.

RELATED: Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary gets money for expansion

RELATED: Bay Beach Animal Sanctuary receives a deluge of birds and mammals after August storms

Green Bay Mayor Eric Genrich accompanied Hill for the presentation of the donation to the wildlife preserve on Tuesday morning.

“I am proud of the city’s continued collaborative work with the Oneida Nation in a multitude of areas, including efforts to protect natural resources and rehabilitate local wildlife,” he said in a statement. “Our common goals, our cooperative vision and our common project will create many opportunities for our communities in the years to come. We are grateful for the partnership and grateful for the donation, which will go to the service of the Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary and the people of Green Bay.

The park, located at 1660 E. Shore Drive, is open daily 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. to the public and admission is free.

A cougar yawns after waking up from a nap in the sun at Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary on February 27, 2016.

Frank Vaisvilas is a Report for America member of the body based at the Green Bay Press-Gazette covering Native American issues in Wisconsin. He can be reached at 920-228-0437 or fvaisvilas@gannett.com, or on Twitter at @vaisvilas_frank. Please consider supporting the journalism that informs our democracy with a tax-deductible giveaway to this reporting effort on GreenBayPressGazette.com/RFA.



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Living inside a wildlife reserve, this community embraces … https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/living-inside-a-wildlife-reserve-this-community-embraces/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/living-inside-a-wildlife-reserve-this-community-embraces/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 06:07:52 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/living-inside-a-wildlife-reserve-this-community-embraces/ (MENAFN-IANS) By Amarpal Singh Verma Abohar, October 4 (IANS / 101Reporters) A careless traveler, coming from Rajasthan and entering Punjab through the town of Abohar in the Fazilka district, might completely miss the fact that he is passing through a wildlife sanctuary. The animals know how to stay away from the open and busy roads […]]]>

(MENAFN-IANS)


By Amarpal Singh Verma

Abohar, October 4 (IANS / 101Reporters) A careless traveler, coming from Rajasthan and entering Punjab through the town of Abohar in the Fazilka district, might completely miss the fact that he is passing through a wildlife sanctuary. The animals know how to stay away from the open and busy roads that crisscross the country. And there are no forests here, only farmland.

The shrine is essentially a tight-knit community of nearly a dozen densely populated villages where hundreds of rare blackbucks fearlessly roam the fields amid the hustle and bustle of busy life. The forestry department does not own any land in this region and yet there is a thriving wildlife reserve, home to thousands of wild animals.

The shrine, which begins in the Punjabi village of Bazidpur Bhoma, is also home to over 30,000 people from the Bishnoi community. The Bishnois are a Hindu sect founded at the end of the 15th century in Rajasthan and are well known for their fierce love for the environment and all that lives.

The Bishnois here in Abohar have consolidated this heritage over the last century by allowing their private lands to moonlight as a special reserve for the protection of the Krishna (blackbuck) and the Chinkara deer (Indian gazelle).

Establish a “private” sanctuary

The person credited for founding the sanctuary is Chaudhary Sant Kumar Bishnoi from the village of Dotaranwali, born in 1915. Sant Kumar grew up in the tradition of preserving wildlife; his father and grandfather persisted in their patrols to chase poachers out of the area. Sant Kumar became more radical and started fining poachers and handing them over to the police. He mobilized residents of surrounding villages to become more proactive in protecting deer, eventually forming the All India Wildlife Defense Bishnoi Committee (AIWDBC).

At the request of the Bishnois, the government of Punjab issued a notification in 1975, declaring the villages of Raipura, Dotaranwali, Rajwali, Sardarpura, Khairpura, Sukhchain, Seetoguno, Maharana, Himmatpura, Rampura, Narainpura, Bishanpura and Bazctidpur Bhoma as Sanctuary Abohar fauna. Sant Kumar received the Indira Gandhi Environmental Prize in 1992 and died six years later. In 2000, the 13 villages were legally declared sanctuaries under the Wildlife Protection Act, 1972.

Ashok Bishnoi, Chaudhary Sant Kumar’s grandson and a retired forestry officer, is now the national vice president of the AIWDC. He told 101Reporters: “Thousands of people in the Bishnoi community are involved in the protection of wildlife. They guard these creatures day and night. As a result, this is the only area in Punjab where there are now blackbucks. “

Blackbuck Guardians

The Bishnois are zealous in their mission to protect the wildlife here and manage the sanctuary with the support of the forestry department. The Forestry Department has deployed 11 staff to the sanctuary and, with 10 daily wage contractors, they oversee the vast reserve spanning 46,513 acres.

But the real obstacle for hunters and poachers are the Bishnois who number in the thousands. The other communities living here, although few in number, have assimilated into the Bishnoi way of life and are equally committed to the cause. RD Bishnoi, head of the Punjab branch of the AIWDBC, said many times unarmed Bishnois have caught armed poachers and handed them over to the police. When wildlife is in perceptible danger, even women prey on hunters on their own, he said.

Anita Rani, Acting Rangeland Manager, Punjab Forest and Wildlife Protection Department, blames the Bishnoi community for the lack of poaching in the area for several years now. “The people of the Bishnoi community saved these innocent creatures. They are always ready to protect them from poachers and provide first aid in case of injury,” she told 101Reporters.

For 26 years, Rajendra Bishnoi has guarded the shrine. He said, “The forest service and the villagers are working day and night. We do not have fixed working hours. As soon as there is information about the injury of a wild animal, we immediately arrive on site. is treated on site and released. If it is serious, he is taken to the rescue center for treatment. Several times we even took injured animals to Ludhiana.

Besides the blackbuck, other animals such as nilgais, pheasants, hares, jackals, feral cats, porcupines, wild boars and black ducks are also found in abundance. The community here is working to arrange food and water for the animals at different locations in the fields.

From birth to death, Bishnois feed the wildlife around them as if they were part of a large family. RD Bishnoi said the community performs the last rites of animals killed in accidents. Sometimes after the death of a female deer, villagers are known to bottle-feed newborn calves.

“Visitors come here in large numbers and find inspiration to protect nature,” said Kuldeep, the warden of Shaheed Mata Amrita Devi Bishnoi Park which was inaugurated last year by the Chief Minister of Punjab, Captain Amarinder Singh. The state government spent 10 crore rupees to build this memorial in the village of Maharana to honor the sacrifice of 363 Bishnois in Jodhpur three centuries ago, who sacrificed their lives to protest the logging by the king for his new palace.

In the shadow of this memorial, the Bishnois continue to cement their heritage.

A stubborn situation

The sanctuary also has its share of challenges and recent development has left Bishnois between a rock and a hard place. Stray dog ​​attacks on deer are increasing. Additionally, the cobra barbed wire that was installed around fields to protect crops from stray animals caused fatal injuries to deer during dog attacks. RD Bishnoi said: “When we raised our concerns, the administration banned cobra thread. So far, most cobra threads have been removed. But dogs are still a threat because of their numbers. increasing exponentially. These dogs attack deer whenever they in the past two years, about three dozen deer have died in dog attacks. Many Nilgans have also been killed by dogs. “

With the last wildlife census taken in the area ten years ago, there are no recent figures to convey the gravity of the situation and, in fact, views are contradictory. According to Rani, when the 2011 census found around four thousand deer in the sanctuary. She believes that this number has not decreased because the Bishnois have always protected them. But RD Bishnoi said deer numbers have declined due to dog attacks. Rani promises a new census soon. “We had sent a proposal to the Wildlife Institute of India Dehradun in this regard, which they accepted,” she said.

Ashok Bishnoi sees the growing number of stray dogs as a major threat to the sanctuary. “For us all living things are equal. We cannot protect deer at the cost of hurting or torturing dogs. The administration should find a safe and quick solution to the stray dog ​​problem,” he said. declared, stressing the powerlessness of the Bishnois in the management of dog attacks.

Forestry department officials have raised the issue with the district administration, which is considering a sterilization campaign for stray dogs. But in the meantime, the number of blackbucks and dead Nilgans is piling up, according to locals.

(The author is a Hanumangarh-based freelance journalist and a member of 101Reporters.com, a pan-Indian network of local journalists)

–IANS

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Living inside a wildlife reserve, this community combines conservation and coexistence https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/living-inside-a-wildlife-reserve-this-community-combines-conservation-and-coexistence/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/living-inside-a-wildlife-reserve-this-community-combines-conservation-and-coexistence/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 08:47:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/living-inside-a-wildlife-reserve-this-community-combines-conservation-and-coexistence/ A careless traveler, coming from Rajasthan and entering Punjab through the town of Abohar in the Fazilka district, might completely miss the fact that he is passing through a wildlife sanctuary. The animals know how to stay away from the open and busy roads that crisscross the country. And there are no forests here, only […]]]>

A careless traveler, coming from Rajasthan and entering Punjab through the town of Abohar in the Fazilka district, might completely miss the fact that he is passing through a wildlife sanctuary. The animals know how to stay away from the open and busy roads that crisscross the country. And there are no forests here, only farmland.

The shrine is essentially a tight-knit community of nearly a dozen densely populated villages where hundreds of rare blackbucks fearlessly roam the fields amid the hustle and bustle of busy life. The forestry department does not own any land in this region and yet there is a thriving wildlife reserve, home to thousands of wild animals.

The shrine, which begins in the Punjabi village of Bazidpur Bhoma, is also home to over 30,000 people from the Bishnoi community. The Bishnois are a Hindu sect founded at the end of the 15th century in Rajasthan and are well known for their fierce love for the environment and all that lives.

The Bishnois here in Abohar have consolidated this heritage over the last century by allowing their private lands to moonlight as a special reserve for the protection of the Krishna (blackbuck) and the Chinkara deer (Indian gazelle).

Establish a “private” sanctuary

The person credited for founding the sanctuary is Chaudhary Sant Kumar Bishnoi from the village of Dotaranwali, born in 1915. Sant Kumar grew up in the tradition of preserving wildlife; his father and grandfather persisted in their patrols to chase poachers out of the area. Sant Kumar became more radical and started fining poachers and handing them over to the police. He mobilized people from surrounding villages to become more proactive in protecting deer, eventually forming the All India Wildlife Defense Bishnoi Committee (AIWDBC).

At the request of the Bishnois, the government of Punjab issued a notification in 1975, declaring the villages of Raipura, Dotaranwali, Rajwali, Sardarpura, Khairpura, Sukhchain, Seetoguno, Maharana, Himmatpura, Rampura, Narainpura, Bishanpura and Bazctidpur Bhoma as Sanctuary Abohar fauna. Sant Kumar received the Indira Gandhi Environmental Prize in 1992 and died six years later. In 2000, the 13 villages were legally declared sanctuaries under the Wildlife Protection Act, 1972.

The Bishnois are zealous in their mission to protect the wildlife here and manage the sanctuary with the support of the forestry department. (Photo credit – Anita Rani)

Ashok Bishnoi, the grandson of Chaudhary Sant Kumar and a retired forestry officer, is now the national vice president of the AIWDC. He said 101journalists, “Thousands of people from the Bishnoi community are involved in the protection of wildlife. They guard these creatures day and night. As a result, this is the only area in Punjab where blackbucks are now found. “

Blackbuck Guardians

The Bishnois are zealous in their mission to protect the wildlife here and manage the sanctuary with the support of the forestry department. The Forestry Department has deployed 11 staff to the sanctuary and, with 10 contract workers on a daily basis, they oversee the vast reserve spanning 46,513 acres.

Abohar’s wildlife roam the fields and villages fearlessly (Photo credit – Anita Rani)

But the real obstacle for hunters and poachers are the Bishnois who number in the thousands. The other communities living here, although few in number, have assimilated into the Bishnoi way of life and are equally committed to the cause. RD Bishnoi, head of the Punjab branch of the AIWDBC, said that many times unarmed Bishnois have caught armed poachers and handed them over to the police. When wildlife is in perceptible danger, even women prey on hunters on their own, he said.

Abohar’s wildlife roam the fields and villages without fear 2 (Photo credit – Anita Rani)

Anita Rani, Acting Rangeland Manager, Punjab Forest and Wildlife Protection Department, blames the Bishnoi community for the lack of poaching in the area for several years now. “The people of the Bishnoi community saved these innocent creatures. They are always ready to protect them from poachers and provide first aid in case of injury, ”she said. 101journalists.

For 26 years, Rajendra Bishnoi has guarded the shrine. He said, “The forest service and the villagers are working day and night. We do not have fixed working hours. As soon as there is information about an injured wild animal, we immediately arrive. If it is a minor injury, the animal is treated on site and released. If he is serious, he is taken to the rescue center for treatment. Several times we even took injured animals to Ludhiana.

Shaheed Mata Amrita Devi Bishnoi Park inside the shrine, built in memory of the 363 Bishnois who gave their lives to protect the Khejri tree (Photo credit – Amarpal Singh Verma)

Besides the blackbuck, other animals such as nilgais, pheasants, hares, jackals, feral cats, porcupines, wild boars and black ducks are also found in abundance. The community here is working to arrange food and water for the animals at different locations in the fields.

From birth to death, Bishnois feed the wildlife around them as if they were part of a large family. RD Bishnoi said the community performs the last rites of animals killed in accidents. Sometimes after the death of a female deer, villagers are known to bottle-feed newborn calves.

“Visitors come here in large numbers and find inspiration to protect nature,” said Kuldeep, the warden of Shaheed Mata Amrita Devi Bishnoi Park which was inaugurated last year by the Chief Minister of Punjab, Captain Amarinder Singh. The state government spent 10 crore rupees to build this memorial in the village of Maharana to honor the sacrifice of 363 Bishnois in Jodhpur three centuries ago, who sacrificed their lives to protest the logging by the king for his new palace.

In the shadow of this memorial, the Bishnois continue to cement their heritage.

A stubborn situation

The sanctuary also has its share of challenges and recent development has left Bishnois between a rock and a hard place. Stray dog ​​attacks on deer are increasing. Additionally, the cobra barbed wire that was installed around fields to protect crops from stray animals caused fatal injuries to deer during dog attacks. RD Bishnoi said: “When we raised our concerns, the administration banned cobra thread. So far, most of the cobra threads have been removed. But dogs are still a threat as their numbers are growing exponentially. These dogs attack the deer whenever they have the chance. In the past two years, around three dozen deer have died in dog attacks. Many Nillais were also killed by dogs.

A painting in Jodhpur depicting the tragedy (Photo credit – fabulousfabs, Flickr)

With the last wildlife census taken in the region ten years ago, there are no recent figures to convey the gravity of the situation and, in fact, views are contradictory. According to Rani, when the 2011 census found around four thousand deer in the sanctuary. She believes that this number has not decreased because the Bishnois have always protected them. But RD Bishnoi said deer numbers have declined due to dog attacks. Rani promises a new census soon. “We had sent a proposal to the Wildlife Institute of India Dehradun in this regard, which they accepted,” she said.

Ashok Bishnoi sees the growing number of stray dogs as a major threat to the sanctuary. “For us, all living things are equal. We cannot protect the deer at the cost of hurting or torturing the dogs. The administration should find a safe and quick solution to the stray dog ​​problem, ”he said, stressing the powerlessness of the Bishnois to deal with dog attacks.

Forestry department officials have raised the issue with the district administration, which is considering a sterilization campaign for stray dogs. But in the meantime, the number of blackbucks and dead Nilgans is piling up, according to locals.

(The author is a Hanumangarh-based freelance journalist and a member of 101Reporters.com, a pan-Indian network of local journalists.)

Tomorrow: How the long tradition of eco-sensitive agriculture helps the Bishnois of Abohar to preserve groundwater.

Read all the latest news, breaking news and coronavirus news here. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Telegram.



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Asola Wildlife Sanctuary to Get Electric Cars & Sightseeing Tours – The New Indian Express https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/asola-wildlife-sanctuary-to-get-electric-cars-sightseeing-tours-the-new-indian-express/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/asola-wildlife-sanctuary-to-get-electric-cars-sightseeing-tours-the-new-indian-express/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 02:43:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/asola-wildlife-sanctuary-to-get-electric-cars-sightseeing-tours-the-new-indian-express/ NEW DELHI: Environment Minister Gopal Rai, inaugurating Wildlife Conservation Week at Asola Wildlife Sanctuary on Saturday, said that from now on, people visiting the sanctuary will receive electric cars and guides through an online reservation system. The minister said in a statement that green spaces like Asola are the city’s lungs and that the forestry […]]]>

NEW DELHI: Environment Minister Gopal Rai, inaugurating Wildlife Conservation Week at Asola Wildlife Sanctuary on Saturday, said that from now on, people visiting the sanctuary will receive electric cars and guides through an online reservation system.

The minister said in a statement that green spaces like Asola are the city’s lungs and that the forestry department is working hard to increase green coverage through large plantations over the past six years.

“There is a butterfly park and a Neeli Jheel in the shrine area, which not many people know about yet. The introduction of an online reservation system and guided tours by electric vehicles will help raise awareness of the sanctuary area as well as the need to conserve green spaces, ”said Rai.

He added that a bicycle path has also been built to allow people to engage in healthy activities such as cycling. Until now, people could only visit the shrine with manual reservations. The entrance fee for adults is Rs 10 and Rs. 5 for children and schoolchildren.

Rai said the national capital’s “green cover” had increased by 2,500 hectares under the government led by Kejriwal, reaching 21.88% coverage. Wildlife week will be observed October 2-8. The forest service is also planning to organize awareness campaigns and competitions for school students during this time in the sanctuary.

The shrine covers an area of ​​32.71 km² on the southern Delhi ridge of the Aravalli Range on the Delhi-Haryana border. Located in South Delhi and northern Faridabad and Gurugram Districts, it is part of the Northern Aravalli Leopard Wildlife Corridor, which stretches from Sariska National Park in Rajasthan to Delhi Ridge.


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“Like a wildlife sanctuary for vermin”: neighbors’ anger at abandoned house overshadowed by huge bush https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/like-a-wildlife-sanctuary-for-vermin-neighbors-anger-at-abandoned-house-overshadowed-by-huge-bush/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/like-a-wildlife-sanctuary-for-vermin-neighbors-anger-at-abandoned-house-overshadowed-by-huge-bush/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/like-a-wildlife-sanctuary-for-vermin-neighbors-anger-at-abandoned-house-overshadowed-by-huge-bush/ A 12-foot bush protruding from the front of a house and garden triggered a huge council cleanup. There have been numerous complaints from residents of Newlyn Green in Park End after jungle-like foliage began to eclipse the front of a seemingly empty property on the road as its leaves reached the roof. Andy Latherom, a […]]]>

A 12-foot bush protruding from the front of a house and garden triggered a huge council cleanup.

There have been numerous complaints from residents of Newlyn Green in Park End after jungle-like foliage began to eclipse the front of a seemingly empty property on the road as its leaves reached the roof.

Andy Latherom, a 57-year-old self-employed person, who has lived on the streets for over 30 years, said: “It’s an absolute stain in the landscape. You try to keep yours nice, we all do. It must be rotting inside. “

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He added, “It’s like a wildlife preserve for vermin. You see all the hedgehogs around and there has been an increase in the number of rats. I’m not saying it’s from there, but I bet you’ll find them there.

Andy isn’t the only person concerned about rats on the street, although no one can confirm that they came from the house with the overgrown trees.

Alice, 78, who has lived in the same house for 48 years, added: “There have been rats and all kinds of rats and people are using it as a dumping ground.



The house on Newlyn Green in Park End became overgrown and was used for tipping flies

While Linda Williams, 70, who lives next door said: “We’ve had more longtails [rats] enough and I am petrified. He [her son] kills them when he catches them. We had an environment [officer] here and they put poison.

“They come along the fence, they come down from the bushes and then they play on the grass. They even try to jump and catch the pigeons.

She added: “One day we caught nine rats, three of them in one night. “

Her son who lives with her, Glenn Williams, 46, said: “You can sit here. [in the living room] and watch them run on the grass in the garden.

Glenn also has other concerns, he added: “The garage had gas cylinders in the back, what if it’s hot and the temperature rises or if children are there? set it on fire. “

Andy expected more damage to the property, adding: “I’m surprised the windows weren’t installed – although they might not be able to find them!”

Residents agreed that the fly spills had increased and Linda said the children would play with the litter in the back garden and leave it dumped on the street.

However, this was not always the case, everyone fondly remembers the family who lived there for decades and raised their three children there.

Alice said, “It’s a beautiful road and it has always been a beautiful road. I couldn’t have had better neighbors, the one next door, the one across the way, they all take care of you and each other.

“It’s just an eyesore and I just think it’s a shame because someone could have it and do it right.”

Alice also said she was told it would reduce the value of her property if it remained in this condition.

Andy added, “It’s a beautiful house and it’s just heartbreaking.”



The house on Newlyn Green in Park End became overgrown and was used for tipping flies
The house on Newlyn Green in Park End became overgrown and was used for tipping flies

Those who live near the house desperately need to see the front and rear gardens sorted.

Linda said: “It’s just beyond a joke. It depresses me now, why should we try to keep it.”

Council has been aware of the condition of the property for at least two years after Linda reported that people could not use the sidewalks with strollers due to the size of the trees.

After this complaint, the board then went out to cut down the trees, however, it only cut the sides and not the top and did no other work to clean up the mess.

Residents said Councilor Stephen Hill of the Middlesbrough Councilors Independent Association helped them try to sort out the issue and also mentioned Mayor Andy Preston said he would see what he could do when he returned. visit a few months ago.

On Wednesday, September 29, the Local Democracy Reporting Service informed council and the mayor that the property was not being maintained.

On Thursday, September 30, the council sent workers to the house where they were seen tackling the massive hedge.



Workers from Middlesbrough Council have come to cut bushes and clean up the house garden on Newlyn Green in Park End
Workers from Middlesbrough Council have come to cut bushes and clean up the house garden on Newlyn Green in Park End

A Middlesbrough Council spokesperson said: ‘Since we received a complaint about an unsightly and overgrown hedge at a property in Newlyn Green in Park End, a site visit has been made and staff have now started. to reduce it.

“We expect to have completed the work and cleared the site on Monday morning and the owner of the property will be charged for the work done.”

Mayor Preston said there was no point cutting the bushes earlier, during the summer months, when they were still growing, but it would be sorted now.

He added that they had tried to locate the owner of the property to threaten to act unless the house was taken care of, but were unable to locate them.

Therefore, the council “stepped in to make things right.”

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Leopard caught in camera trap in Delhi’s Asola Bhatti wildlife reserve for the first time https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/leopard-caught-in-camera-trap-in-delhis-asola-bhatti-wildlife-reserve-for-the-first-time/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/leopard-caught-in-camera-trap-in-delhis-asola-bhatti-wildlife-reserve-for-the-first-time/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 12:45:52 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/leopard-caught-in-camera-trap-in-delhis-asola-bhatti-wildlife-reserve-for-the-first-time/ The Delhi Forestry Department has alerted residents living near the Asola Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary in the nation’s capital to the presence of a leopard in the area. It comes after a leopard has been captured on a camera trap set up near the office of the deputy conservator of forests. Authorities said the leopard was […]]]>

The Delhi Forestry Department has alerted residents living near the Asola Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary in the nation’s capital to the presence of a leopard in the area.

It comes after a leopard has been captured on a camera trap set up near the office of the deputy conservator of forests.

Authorities said the leopard was seen moving in the dark in a camera trap set 250m from the Tughlaqabad forestry office.

The camera trap has been set up in the sanctuary to take a census of leopards.

Screenshot

According to some reports, the inhabitants of Sangam Vihar, Deoli and Sanjay Colony Bhatti Mines have been alerted to the presence of the feline in the region.

What happened?

“The leopard was captured recently by a camera trap set just 250 meters from the office of the Assistant Conservator of Forests, South Division. We learned about it while browsing the footage last night,” an official said.

“We made announcements in the villages and asked residents not to venture out alone at night. Parents were asked to keep an eye on their children,” he added.

Although there have been allegations from locals in the past of leopard sightings in Asola, this is the first time that the presence of the big cat has been established beyond doubt.

The area is part of the Northern Aravalli Leopard Wildlife Corridor, which stretches from Sariska National Park in Rajasthan to the Delhi Ridge.

leopard
AFP

In 2017, a family of three leopards was sighted in the wildlife reserve covering an area of ​​32.71 km² on the Southern Delhi Ridge of Aravalli hill range on Delhi-Haryana.

“Leopard sightings have increased because the felines have found their home here. Three leopards have been spotted in an abandoned open pit,” an official said.

According to forestry officials, the increase in the population of prey like blackbucks could be the reason for the presence of leopards in the area.

This is the third time that a leopard sighting has been reported in Delhi.

In June, the department used drone cameras and set up trap nets after a leopard was spotted at DLF Chattarpur Farms.

Also last month, residents informed the department of the presence of a leopard in Mehrauli. A video of him sitting on top of a DTC bus had triggered panic in the area.



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Long Pasture Wildlife Sanctuary opens new Discovery Center https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/long-pasture-wildlife-sanctuary-opens-new-discovery-center/ https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/long-pasture-wildlife-sanctuary-opens-new-discovery-center/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 20:31:33 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/long-pasture-wildlife-sanctuary-opens-new-discovery-center/ A bright yellow sea of ​​goldenrod stretches across the meadows and mudflats of Bone Hill Road in Cummaquid as it winds its way to the entrance to the Long Pasture Wildlife Sanctuary, where the 110-acre setting is now home to a brand new discovery center. The new building opened last week with a groundbreaking ceremony […]]]>

A bright yellow sea of ​​goldenrod stretches across the meadows and mudflats of Bone Hill Road in Cummaquid as it winds its way to the entrance to the Long Pasture Wildlife Sanctuary, where the 110-acre setting is now home to a brand new discovery center.

The new building opened last week with a groundbreaking ceremony attended by Mass Audubon officials and Long Pasture supporters.

A $ 1.8 million fundraising campaign, which began in the spring of 2020, saw the successful completion of the building, which complements other modest structures in the historic sanctuary setting next to Old King’s Highway and, according to the director by Long Pasture Ian Ives, is designed “to improve the way we do our work, (rather than) expand it.

A seaside mural by artist Barbara Harmon covers a wall in the reception area of ​​the new Discovery Center.

Along with its many programs for children and adults, the sanctuary continues to focus on work to help restore the region’s wetlands and manage salt marsh areas to help mitigate the effects of change. climate. Long Pasture, added Ives, is working to promote Mass Audubon’s statewide education and diversity “action plan”; habitat conservation and management; and advocacy, especially at a time of heightened climate concerns.


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