Wildlife sanctuary – Rio Grande Delta Audubon http://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 23:50:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-50x50.png Wildlife sanctuary – Rio Grande Delta Audubon http://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/ 32 32 Rave reviews from the Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/rave-reviews-from-the-ipswich-river-wildlife-sanctuary/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 23:50:23 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/rave-reviews-from-the-ipswich-river-wildlife-sanctuary/ If getting back to nature was one of your New Year’s resolutions, then a visit to the Mass Audubon Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary in Topsfield and Wenham must be on your bucket list in 2022. With 2,800 acres of landscape and over 12 miles of trails and terrain ranging from forests to wetlands, it’s no […]]]>

If getting back to nature was one of your New Year’s resolutions, then a visit to the Mass Audubon Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary in Topsfield and Wenham must be on your bucket list in 2022.

With 2,800 acres of landscape and over 12 miles of trails and terrain ranging from forests to wetlands, it’s no wonder this sanctuary is one of the most beloved in the entire state.

As a member of the Rhode Island Audubon Society and avid hiker with my kids, one glance at this place makes me want to make the trip 100%. The Ipswich River Sanctuary truly has an adventure for all nature lovers.

Whether you want to take a hike hoping to find wildlife, sit and bird watch for a while, or enjoy beautiful flowers in their gardens, this sanctuary seems worth a visit any time of the year.

The only downsides might be that four-legged friends aren’t allowed and the shrine isn’t open on Mondays.

The first one that I really understand. There are so many animals of all shapes and sizes that inhabit Ipswich River Sanctuary, bringing dogs can scare many of them.

Being closed on Mondays also makes a bit of sense, with all the staff shortages lately. Ipswich River Sanctuary requires visitors to pay to park, so it may not be possible to staff the admission desk staff seven days a week.

If you are visiting Tuesday through Sunday, however, reviews seem to agree that hiking is a must and that kayaking or canoeing during the warmer months is also ideal here. With a 4.8 out of five star rating on Google, here are some of the reasons people love to come back to this Mass Audubon sanctuary over and over again.

Visitors to Ipswich River Wildlife Preserve can’t help but raving

It’s one of the largest wildlife sanctuaries in Massachusetts, and visitors seem to think it’s one of the best, too. Here’s what people are saying about the Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary in Topsfield and Wenham.

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Owner describes plan to turn Tollerton Hall into a wildlife sanctuary https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/owner-describes-plan-to-turn-tollerton-hall-into-a-wildlife-sanctuary/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 04:56:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/owner-describes-plan-to-turn-tollerton-hall-into-a-wildlife-sanctuary/ A businessman who owns Tollerton Hall has said he plans to create a wildlife preserve on the grounds that could house deer and alpacas – but he’s open to suggestions. Since Ian Kershaw bought the stately home four years ago, work has taken place to make it a home for his family, but now he […]]]>

A businessman who owns Tollerton Hall has said he plans to create a wildlife preserve on the grounds that could house deer and alpacas – but he’s open to suggestions.

Since Ian Kershaw bought the stately home four years ago, work has taken place to make it a home for his family, but now he wants to create something different.

The lobby is located on a 20,000 square foot site and Mr. Kershaw’s Kaaimans International business occupies approximately 1,000 square feet, with separate entrance and parking.

The 52-year-old had previously moved his car sales business to part of the site as part of his renovation project.

Now his plan is to take about 25 acres out of the 100 acres of land to make it a wildlife preserve.

He said: “I have to learn a little bit about it, I don’t really have any experience in this area.

“I would like to put deer and alpacas but I am open to all suggestions.

“We already have badgers and have planted 30-40 fruit trees in the past month or so.

“We have already planted a few hundred trees.”

Mr. Kershaw’s passion for wildlife and his love for animals were the main reason for his new adventure.

He added: “The goal is to improve the wildlife, the wildlife is fun to watch and to have that kind of sight.

“There is a stream running through it, I do the setup and then I determine which animals are most suitable.

“I love animals, I love nature, I thought it would be a good thing to do.”

The shrine will not be open to the public, but he intends to ask local schools to come and visit it when it opens.

Mr Kershaw hopes the shrine will be up and running by Easter next year.

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How Wildlife Prepare for the Cold Winter Months: Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/how-wildlife-prepare-for-the-cold-winter-months-aspen-valley-wildlife-sanctuary/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 11:19:57 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/how-wildlife-prepare-for-the-cold-winter-months-aspen-valley-wildlife-sanctuary/ Submitted by Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary There are many ways that wildlife prepare for the cold winter months. Some species, such as groundhogs and bears, engage in varying degrees of hibernation. Birds migrate, while wolves, foxes and moose use various forms of physical adaptation to get through the cold winter days. Interestingly, although bears prepare […]]]>

Submitted by Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary

There are many ways that wildlife prepare for the cold winter months. Some species, such as groundhogs and bears, engage in varying degrees of hibernation. Birds migrate, while wolves, foxes and moose use various forms of physical adaptation to get through the cold winter days.

Interestingly, although bears prepare for a long winter nap, they aren’t true hibernators. Instead, bears go into mild hibernation known as torpor, where heart and respiratory rates drop, body temperature drops slightly, and they don’t eat or release bodily waste.

After settling in their dens, bears will sleep for an extended period of time, but may be woken up by noise or warmer temperatures. Bears can even be seen outside during this time.

Cubs are born in the den in late January or February while their mothers are in hibernation. The cubs then stay with their mother in the den until spring. With a litter of one to four cubs, literally underfoot, the rest time is really “light”.

Chipmunks are also mild hibernators. These gatherers collect and hide (store) their food in underground dens. There they settle into a self-imposed lockdown, waking up every few days to feed on their caches of stored food. Once the reserves are depleted, they are thought to hibernate more completely.

On the other hand, groundhogs are one of Canada’s largest true hibernators. When a groundhog is down for the winter, it is almost impossible to wake up. While sleeping, a groundhog relies on its accumulated body fat to survive; coupled with a drop in body temperature and an astonishing drop in heart rate from 80 to just four or five beats per minute. In this state of reduced activity, energy is retained during the long, cold winter months when little food is available.

Regardless of the type of hibernation, it has little to do with the change in temperature. Rather, it is a survival tactic used by animals to overcome a food shortage. Essentially, wildlife prepares for the winter months by increasing body fat and reserves. After that, they slow down to save power.

Furley (one of our four bears in residence at the Sanctuary), for example, did not hibernate before settling forever here at Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary (AVWS). Furley lived in a small cement enclosure located in a provincial park until it closed in 2013. There Furley was fed during the winter months, which overrode his natural instinct to hibernate. This has been done on behalf of the public all year round, which is what we oppose here at the Sanctuary.

In Aspen Valley, Furley has a large enclosure with its own pond in a cool, shady forest. Here we start supplementing her food intake in the fall, but stop feeding her in November.

(Photo: Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary)

The AVWS is also home to a number of non-hibernating species. On the contrary, they adapt to the cold.

Our arctic fox, Mystic (pictured above), is a subzero specialist who adapts well to the winter months. Its compact body, short legs and small ears help retain heat, while its large, hairy legs allow it to walk on snowdrifts.

Able to withstand Muskoka’s colder temperatures, Mystic will often be seen sheltered in his enclosure, with his long, bushy tail wrapped around his head like a scarf. Mystic’s coat also changes color from gray to white. This adaptation allows the arctic fox to blend into the white canvas of winter and escape predators.

Wolves are largely carnivorous, and by targeting small to medium-sized prey in the wild, they do quite well on their own during the winter months. This is the time when sick, injured and weak prey are most vulnerable. This is the circle of good news / bad news in life. Wolves also depend on a plentiful diet in the fall and a thick coat, which keeps them warm on colder winter nights.

(Photo: Photograph of Ina)

In the wild, contemporaries of our beloved moose, Ella, store large amounts of fat that their bodies will use up through the winter months. Another adaptation is the significant thickening of their coat, which can be a problem in a mild winter. Heat stress and tick infestations are common in moose when lakes are frozen over and there is nowhere to cool off.

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Nilgai rescued while recovering at Asola Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/nilgai-rescued-while-recovering-at-asola-bhatti-wildlife-sanctuary/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 06:20:19 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/nilgai-rescued-while-recovering-at-asola-bhatti-wildlife-sanctuary/ Homepage ” General ” Environment ” Nilgai rescued while recovering at Asola Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary New Delhi, December 27 (SocialNews.XYZ) An injured nilgai (a type of antelope) who was rescued near the premises of the Delhi Jal Board (DJB) in the Mandawali region of the nation’s capital is currently being treated at Asola Bhatti Wildlife […]]]>

New Delhi, December 27 (SocialNews.XYZ) An injured nilgai (a type of antelope) who was rescued near the premises of the Delhi Jal Board (DJB) in the Mandawali region of the nation’s capital is currently being treated at Asola Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary.

The nilgai with an injured leg was spotted by a passerby outside the DJB premises on Sunday evening. He immediately informed the Delhi Forestry Department.


The Forestry Department in turn contacted Wildlife SOS for reinforcements to carry out the rescue operation.

A joint operation led by officials from the Forestry Department and Wildlife SOS subsequently successfully rescued the animal using rescue equipment and safety nets.

“Agitated by his injury and the crowd that had gathered, the nilgai started to cross the busy road. It took rescuers nearly an hour to safely transport the distressed antelope to Asola Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary, where she is currently receiving medical treatment. a statement from Wildlife SOS said Monday.

Wildlife SOS CEO and Co-Founder Kartick Satyanarayan said, “The nilgai or blue bull is the largest antelope in Asia, and this species is endemic to the Indian subcontinent. Due to their large size, rescue operations involving Nilgans must be carried out. with the greatest caution. Wildlife SOS was able to assist the Forestry Department with a rapid response and ensure the safety of this injured Nilgai.

Deputy Director of Special Projects for Wildlife SOS Wasim Akram said: “It took us almost an hour to complete the rescue because we didn’t want to ambush the animal in distress. days. We are grateful to the public for being sensitive to the plight of the injured animal. “

Wildlife SOS is a non-profit charitable organization established in 1998 with the primary objective of saving and rehabilitating distressed wildlife across India. It also leads wildlife and nature protection projects to promote conservation, fight poaching and illegal trade in wildlife.

In January, the Forestry Department evacuated a nilgai from the park near Purana Qila and sent him to Asola Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary.

This time, the nilgai had strayed into urban areas and was found roaming this park for almost a month before being recovered. Fortunately, the animal was not injured.

Source: IANS

Nilgai rescued while recovering at Asola Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary

About Gopi

Gopi Adusumilli is a programmer. He is editor-in-chief of SocialNews.XYZ and president of AGK Fire Inc.

He enjoys designing websites, developing mobile apps, and posting news articles from a variety of authenticated news sources.

When it comes to writing, he enjoys writing about current world politics and Indian films. Its future plans include the development of SocialNews.XYZ into a news website that is free from bias or judgment towards any.

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Conservation organizations plant 26,000 trees to rewild Mongo Valley Wildlife Sanctuary https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/conservation-organizations-plant-26000-trees-to-rewild-mongo-valley-wildlife-sanctuary/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 00:10:57 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/conservation-organizations-plant-26000-trees-to-rewild-mongo-valley-wildlife-sanctuary/ Phase 1 of the Mongo Valley Wildlife Sanctuary’s reforestation and rewilding plans brought together conservation organization Aussie Ark and partners WildArk, Re: wild and the Australian Reptile Park to begin planting 26,000 rainforest trees and of eucalyptus.Mongo Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, which was secured earlier in the year by the organizations, is 1,500 hectares of bush […]]]>

Phase 1 of the Mongo Valley Wildlife Sanctuary’s reforestation and rewilding plans brought together conservation organization Aussie Ark and partners WildArk, Re: wild and the Australian Reptile Park to begin planting 26,000 rainforest trees and of eucalyptus.
Mongo Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, which was secured earlier in the year by the organizations, is 1,500 hectares of bush habitat in Upper Mongogarie, New South Wales. The site is located approximately 30 kilometers from the World Heritage listed Mallanganee National Park and 70 kilometers from the Richmond Range National Park. The future sanctuary is located in one of Australia’s most biodiverse regions, reflected by the diverse plant communities that are home to a range of mammals, birds, reptiles, frogs and invertebrates.
The replanting of 26,000 trees was supported by the Byron Bay-based organization ReForest Now. ReForest Now was created by an unwavering passion to see large-scale reforestation and regeneration of Australian rainforest ecosystems. A team of 32 people spent three full days on site, drilling 26,000 holes, filling each hole with water and fertilizer crystals and of course planting each tree by hand. Liz Gabriel, Managing Director of Aussie Ark, says that “At Aussie Ark, we are working very hard to restore the Mongo Valley Wildlife Sanctuary to its natural state – from the ground up. Replanting these trees is just one step for us. We know that by rebuilding habitat, our wildlife will have a home. “
Gabriel adds “Trees play a vital role in the survival of our wildlife – they provide food and shelter for endangered wildlife. We are very proud to put 26,000 plants back in the ground.

In addition to the 26,000 trees planted, the team also managed to regenerate an additional five hectares of existing bush by removing weeds, including lantana from the smothered environment.
Maximo Bottaro, Managing Director and Co-Founder of Reforest Now, notes that “this project is one of the most important that ReForest Now has supported and working with the Aussie Ark team to create the Mongo Valley Wildlife Sanctuary is really special. Our team was waiting to work with people. like that. We know that by combining our tree planting and bush regeneration capabilities with Aussie Ark’s specialty in wildlife and rewilding, together we can make a huge impact on the native Australian flora and fauna. “
Other plans for the property include creating a wildlife-free sanctuary, suitable to accommodate the return of a suite of endangered Australian wildlife to the property, including the iconic Koala. The wildlife sanctuary will be modeled after the Aussie Ark wildlife sanctuary creation model launched in Barrington Tops, NSW.
Mongo Valley Wildlife Sanctuary holds so much hope for wildlife conservation that its significant biodiversity and ecological value will prove vital for the protection and preservation of Australian wildlife. You can support the Mongo Valley Shrine by donating today at aussieark.org.au/mongo-valley/ – only $ 5 equals one tree planted.
More information on the non-profit organization, Aussie Ark on aussieark.org.au/

Related Articles

July 29, 2021 – Conservation organizations secure bush habitat for proposed Mongo Valley Wildlife Sanctuary

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May 27, 2021 – Aussie Ark partners with Volkswagen to protect endangered Australian species

January 29, 2021 – Aussie Ark spots first Koala Joey in Barrington Wildlife Sanctuary

January 20, 2021 – Aussie Ark receives $ 850,000 grant to help wildlife affected by bushfires

December 23, 2020 – Crowdfunding Success Helps Aussie Ark Acquire Wildlife Sanctuary

December 15, 2020 – Aussie Ark Shares Her Wildlife Conservation Experiences During Summer School Vacation

November 27, 2020 – Aussie Ark Celebrates Opening of Barrington Wildlife Sanctuary

November 24, 2020 – The Aussie Ark Drives Platypus Into The Wild After Bushfire Rescue

October 20, 2020 – Aussie Ark launch campaign to raise funds for the purchase of Curricabark Wildlife Refuge

September 19, 2020 – The Aussie Ark opens its doors to the general public for the second year in a row

September 16, 2020 – The Aussie Ark Welcomes Birth Of Endangered Eastern Quolls

September 9, 2020 – Aussie Ark Partners with WIRES to Increase Conservation Efforts

September 7, 2020 – Zoos SA and Aussie Ark celebrate National Endangered Species Day

August 14, 2020 – Aussie Ark announces the winning project of its Conservation from the Couch campaign

July 15, 2020 – Aussie Ark celebrates the birth of two brush-tailed rock wallabies at Barrington Shrine

May 23, 2020 – Aussie Ark commits to turtle conservation on World Turtle Day

February 20, 2020 – The Aussie Ark Is Recognized Internationally For Its Importance In Recovering From Fires And Droughts

February 12, 2020 – Aussie Ark Pledges to Save Critically Endangered Manning River Turtles


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A wildlife reserve for safer roads: funding for Oldham projects https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/a-wildlife-reserve-for-safer-roads-funding-for-oldham-projects/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/a-wildlife-reserve-for-safer-roads-funding-for-oldham-projects/ The Oldham Council’s Local Improvement Fund (LIF) subcommittee met on Monday evening to approve funding for 18 neighborhood projects totaling £ 467,000. Among the 18 projects that were successful in securing funding included the creation of a wildlife sanctuary at Sickle Street, improving road safety in Royton, and restoring the Bulldogs community space at Fitton […]]]>

The Oldham Council’s Local Improvement Fund (LIF) subcommittee met on Monday evening to approve funding for 18 neighborhood projects totaling £ 467,000.

Among the 18 projects that were successful in securing funding included the creation of a wildlife sanctuary at Sickle Street, improving road safety in Royton, and restoring the Bulldogs community space at Fitton Hill and Hathershaw.

LIF was established in 2019 to fund projects to improve neighborhoods in Oldham for local residents.

Due to the effects of the pandemic, it was agreed that the LIF would be included in the council’s budget. £ 500.00 was designated for the subcommittee and any remainder would be used as a contingency fund for agreed projects.

In order for projects to secure funding, expressions of interest were submitted to LIF, some of which were then chosen to go through the full application process.

Oldham Council Chief Councilor Arooj Shah said: “During these difficult times it is essential that Oldham Council helps residents recover both socially and economically and the Local Improvement Fund is a great way to do this.

“We have seen so many deserving applications, but we have selected the ones that we believe will have the most positive impact on our local communities.

“I look forward to seeing these projects come to life and seeing the residents reap the rewards. ”

Some of the other projects funded were the refurbishment of the Springhead Community Center, improvements to Crompton Cemetery, and repairs to the Freizland Arena, an equestrian facility in Saddleworth.

Other projects include several traffic calming measures in Chadderton and Lees as well as Royton. The areas that will be targeted are Firwood Park Estate, Burnley Lane, Salmon Fields Road, Rowland Way, Medlock Way and the road to St Paul’s School.

LIF, made up of representatives from Labor, Conservatives and Liberal Democrats, received 42 expressions of interest from the start of the last round of submissions in June until the July 23 deadline.

Representatives then met in August and noted expressions of interest, 23 proceeded to the full nomination stage where they were considered by the advisory committee and then the subcommittee.


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Whangārei Kamo Wildlife Sanctuary plans to bring more animals https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/whangarei-kamo-wildlife-sanctuary-plans-to-bring-more-animals/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/whangarei-kamo-wildlife-sanctuary-plans-to-bring-more-animals/ Pre-opening of the Kamo Whangarei wildlife reserve. Video / Tania White Bringing in more animals is part of Kamo Wildlife Sanctuary’s plans as New Zealand’s only big cat park prepares to open to the public. A group of around 35 Northlanders who helped the park with upgraded facilities, animal feed and other aids were invited […]]]>

Pre-opening of the Kamo Whangarei wildlife reserve. Video / Tania White

Bringing in more animals is part of Kamo Wildlife Sanctuary’s plans as New Zealand’s only big cat park prepares to open to the public.

A group of around 35 Northlanders who helped


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One-week-old wandering tiger returns safely to wildlife sanctuary https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/one-week-old-wandering-tiger-returns-safely-to-wildlife-sanctuary/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 08:05:37 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/one-week-old-wandering-tiger-returns-safely-to-wildlife-sanctuary/ The hunt for the tiger that has strayed from its wildlife reserve in Uthai Thani is finally over. After a week of surveying the surrounding area – and drawing the public’s attention to news and social media sites – Vichit the Tiger was located and returned unharmed to its natural habitat at the Wildlife Sanctuary […]]]>

The hunt for the tiger that has strayed from its wildlife reserve in Uthai Thani is finally over. After a week of surveying the surrounding area – and drawing the public’s attention to news and social media sites – Vichit the Tiger was located and returned unharmed to its natural habitat at the Wildlife Sanctuary of Huai Kha Khaeng.

Vichit wears a collar with an electronic tag that alerts wildlife officials to the cat’s movement, though apparently not close enough to capture the tiger sooner. The transmitter recorded movements showing that the large car traveled approximately 83 kilometers in total before returning to the wildlife sanctuary.

Tracking data showed that the tiger has come close enough to 6 different temples and communities to raise the alarm, both that the wild animal could harm a human or the livestock that locals breed in the area and that the cat could itself be injured or killed by human interaction. At one point it was rumored that Vichit had been hit by a car, but that luckily did not happen.

The tiger made a winding journey, exploring Mae Wong National Park in Nakhon Sawan to Kamphaeng Phet Province in Pang Sila Thong District. A wildlife official said Vichit mostly wandered over small hills covered with shrubs and through eucalyptus and tapioca plantations during his week-long adventure.

The 12th Conservation Area Office in Nakhon Sawan said the tiger adventure that went viral had raised awareness about tiger conservation. They said it is likely that tigers will stray again in the future as the tiger population increases in habitat that is no longer large enough to contain them all. Villages and farms near the habitat should take safety precautions and educate themselves about tigers to understand their nature and how to protect people and their livestock from any future encounter with tigers.

SOURCE: Thai PBS World


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SC to hear the appeal of the government of Rajasthan. on the Nahargarh wildlife reserve https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/sc-to-hear-the-appeal-of-the-government-of-rajasthan-on-the-nahargarh-wildlife-reserve/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 17:00:26 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/sc-to-hear-the-appeal-of-the-government-of-rajasthan-on-the-nahargarh-wildlife-reserve/ The National Green Tribunal ordered the cessation of commercial activities in protected areas The Supreme Court on Wednesday considered an appeal filed by the government of Rajasthan against an order by the National Green Tribunal (NGT) to shut down commercial activities in the notified area of ​​the Nahargarh Fort and Wildlife Sanctuary from December 1. […]]]>

The National Green Tribunal ordered the cessation of commercial activities in protected areas

The Supreme Court on Wednesday considered an appeal filed by the government of Rajasthan against an order by the National Green Tribunal (NGT) to shut down commercial activities in the notified area of ​​the Nahargarh Fort and Wildlife Sanctuary from December 1.

A judiciary headed by Judge S. Abdul Nazeer notified Rajendra Tiwari, who obtained the order to close the NGT in October. Mr. Tiwari was asked to drop his meter and the court closed the case after eight weeks.

At first glance, the court disagreed with the argument made by lead lawyer Manish Singhvi, appearing for the Rajasthani authorities, that they would tone down the light and sound show at the fort. Mr Singhvi said the government has also been running a restaurant in the area for 30 years. He said business activities were limited to providing refreshments to tourists.

The court questioned the idea of ​​having a sound and light show in a protected forest area. He said Mr. Singhvi’s claims about the government-run restaurant needed to be investigated. The judiciary also asked about the availability of alcohol in the forest area.

Restaurant in operation

The NGT in October ordered the government of Rajasthan to shut down restaurants operating there, saying non-forestry activities cannot be allowed without the centre’s approval.

The NGT had classified restaurants and sound and light shows as non-forestry activities incompatible with the objectives of the Wildlife Act.

“We order that all restaurants operating in the notified forest area of ​​Nahargarh Wildlife Sanctuary / Nahargarh Fort be discontinued with effect from December 1, 2021. In the event of a dispute, the boundaries should be verified jointly by the Forestry Department and the collector, Jaipur. The NGT had said.

“We also order that the sound and light program in the area of ​​the wildlife reserve be suspended as of the said date. However, it is clarified that this will not affect the parking and entry of visitors into the fort / museum. However, the Forestry Department will install noise barriers in the appropriate places to mitigate the impact of noise generated by vehicles, ”he added.

The NGT had also asked the Forestry Department to regulate the number of vehicles and parking spaces.

The Forestry Department may also regulate other activities that may be compatible with the purpose of the Wildlife Law and Forest Conservation Law in Notified Forest and Wildlife Areas, the NGT said while asking the collector. of Jaipur to ensure compliance with its ordinance.


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SC agrees to hear appeal against NGT order https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/sc-agrees-to-hear-appeal-against-ngt-order/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 13:29:51 +0000 https://riograndedeltaaudubon.org/sc-agrees-to-hear-appeal-against-ngt-order/ When issuing a plea notice, the Supreme Court asked counsel for the appellants to stop the sound and light program in the region. “How are you wronged? Why do you allow non-forestry activities there, ”a bench of Judges S Abdul Nazeer and Krishna Murari told senior counsel Manish Singhvi, who was appearing for the appellants […]]]>

When issuing a plea notice, the Supreme Court asked counsel for the appellants to stop the sound and light program in the region.

“How are you wronged? Why do you allow non-forestry activities there, ”a bench of Judges S Abdul Nazeer and Krishna Murari told senior counsel Manish Singhvi, who was appearing for the appellants – Department of Archeology and Museum et al.

Singhvi told the bench that tourists visit the historic monument and that there is an RTDC restaurant that has been operating for 30 years. He said that without any restaurant, tourists will have nothing to cool off there.

“We will hear that,” the bench said, adding: “You stop the sound and light program.”

The highest court found that there had been no demolition order in the area.

“What are you doing with that alcohol business over there,” observed the bench during the hearing.

The highest court issued an opinion and requested answers from the plaintiff, on whose request the NGT had made the order in the case, and others. He posted the case for hearing after eight weeks.

The NGT, in its order of October 4, also ordered that the sound and light program in the area of ​​the wildlife reserve be suspended from December 1.

In its appeal, filed with the Supreme Court through attorney DK Devesh, the department and others said that Nahargarh Fort is located about 15 km from Jaipur city, at the end of the forest area. He said that in general, the number of tourists to Nahargarh Fort in a year is around 7.14 lakh.

“In such a situation, the shortage of basic food and grocery facilities for tourists will occur,” he said.

The plea stated that after about two years tourists resumed visiting Jaipur in large numbers and that the lack of any refreshment service would cause them great inconvenience.

“The sound and light show takes place from the ‘Kesar Kyari’ of the Amer Fort and it is not only an attraction for local and foreign tourists, but it accurately and effectively presents the history of Amer and Rajasthan. and educational facts. By its closure, tourists will be deprived of these attractive and educational activities, ”he said.

In its ordinance, the NGT stated that restaurants, as well as light and sound programs, are non-forest activities that are not allowed in forest areas, nor do they comply with the objectives of the Wildlife Law.

“Accordingly, we order that all restaurants operating in the notified forest area of ​​Nahargarh Wildlife Sanctuary / Nahargarh Fort be discontinued with effect from December 1, 2021. In the event of a dispute, the boundaries should be verified jointly by the Forestry Department and the Jaipur collector, “the court said.

“We also order that the sound and light program in the area of ​​the wildlife reserve be interrupted from the said date. It is however specified that this will not affect the parking and entry of visitors into the fort / museum”, he had declared.

The NGT had also said that the Forestry Department would install noise walls in appropriate places to mitigate the impact of noise generated by vehicles. He said the forestry department will also regulate the number of vehicles and parking spaces.

The court had issued the order on a plea filed by a native of Rajasthan against non-forestry activities carried out at the Nahargarh Wildlife Sanctuary, including the Nahargarh Fort near Jaipur in Rajasthan.

According to the applicant before the NGT, in accordance with the Supreme Court ruling, no non-forestry activities are allowed in the forest area, yet non-forestry activities have been authorized in the form of restaurants and the excise service has issued a Bar license to resorts / hotels, cafeterias located in Nahargarh Wildlife Sanctuary without prior permission from the Forestry Department.

With PTI inputs.


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