Mogo animal park campsite | Sydney Urban List


Some spots on the south coast are too iconic to miss.

Ulladulla’s Hayden’s Pies is your highway stop for crocodile pies; Seven Mile Beach is a hit anytime of the year, and Budderoo National Park will always hold a special place in our hearts when it comes to some of NSW’s finest hikes. If you frequent the South Coast more than you would like to admit, as in – the crew of the Berry Donut Van know you by first and last name – then you will also be fine through the animal kingdom known as of Mogo Wildlife Zoo.

The park, which protects and preserves endangered species like African lions, cheetahs, red pandas, Sumatran tigers and silver gibbons, has fallen in the direct line of last year’s bushfires, which struck the south coast of New South Wales in a devastating way. Now, to really keep people coming back to visit the zoo, Mogo Wildlife Park has launched a bespoke camping offer and yes, you’ll want to reserve your spot.

For the very first time, you can now camp overnight at Mogo Wildlife Park with an all-inclusive location so you can make the most of your time down south. Your stay results in a real campsite on the site of the zoo with tents, beds and all your meals sorted as well as a group welcome of animals on arrival.

You’ll also be up to date with all about the rich history of the South Coast and a live country music showdown around a campfire after dinner. The next morning you will wake up early to drink fresh tea, coffee, hot chocolate, bacon and spring rolls, fruit platters and all the breakfast side dishes overlooking the park’s Sumatran tigers (prepare you to be absolutely blown away).

After breakfast, you will be free to explore the zoo as well as a private giraffe feeding session.

Mogo Wildlife Park’s overnight camping offer is only for a limited time, with specific dates locked in from late May through early October. To set specific dates and book, you can find more information here.

And on the way down, make sure to pass Franco’s Pizza Bar.

Image credit: Mogo Wildlife Park


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