With the onset of summer, wildlife migration to Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary begins

However, the influx of wildlife is relatively low this time due to better rains in the sanctuary as well as adjacent tiger reserves until December 15.

However, the influx of wildlife is relatively low this time due to better rains in the sanctuary as well as adjacent tiger reserves until December 15.

With the onset of summer, the seasonal migration of wild animals has started from adjacent wildlife sanctuaries in Karnataka and Tamil Nadu to the Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary (WWS).

The influx of wildlife is relatively low this time due to better rains at the sanctuary as well as adjacent tiger reserves through December 15, said Jose Mathew, assistant forest curator, WWS.
The Hindu . However, that would increase significantly by the end of February, he said.

The sanctuary is a refuge for wild animals during the summer due to the easy availability of fodder and water throughout the year. Nevertheless, officials have taken very structured measures to ensure the availability of fodder and water, apart from other protective measures.

As many as 26 new brush check dams have been constructed and 34 out of 168 check dams have been de-silted so far to ensure drinking water for animals, Mathew said.

As part of forage management, about 289 hectares of coarse grassland has been cut to grow soft grass, and weeds have been removed from 83 hectares of forest land, he said. Sanctuary authorities also plan to map fields and water bodies to ensure fodder supply during the dry season.

Firewalls have also been erected over 195 km, including a 27 km stretch at the state borders, over a width of 10 meters.

“We conducted four forest fire awareness sessions to sensitize those residing at the edge of the forests. We plan to hold another 20 similar sessions in the coming days,” Mr. Mathew said.

No less than 160 frontline forest workers, including 130 temporary forest observers, are deployed for protection with essential equipment and wireless sets.

Besides 24 permanent anti-poaching camps and five watchtowers at strategic points, 15 new machans (temporary watchtowers) have started operating on the four forest massifs of the sanctuary.

This year, sanctuary authorities have registered up to 186 forestry staff phone numbers with the Forest Survey of India. The latter would issue alerts on the incidence of forest fires to registered telephone numbers so that officials could react quickly.

A 24-hour control room is also set up to give the alert in the event of a forest fire. This can be reached at 0493-6223500 and 8547603486.

Comments are closed.